JoyceGroup Chronology

What we’ve read and when we read it

This list only goes back as far as December 2009. Since June of 1998 (when this group was founded), we’ve been through Ulysses three times, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man twice, Dubliners twice, Exiles Twice, Stephen Hero twice, and we just passed the midpoint in Finnegans Wake, which we’ve been working on since 2001.

Here’s how you find out when we’ll be meeting again, and for more on the history of JGSF, go here.


09/23/2017

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 438, line 22 from the top
1961 edition p. 462, line 30 from the top
1986 edition p. 377, line 929
(The crossexamination proceeds re Bloom and the bucket. A large bucket.

Finnegans Wake
p. 349, line 25 from the top:
It is for the castomercies mudwake surveice. The victar. Pleace to notnoys speach above your dreadths, please to doughboys.


09/16/2017

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 436, line 10 from the top
1961 edition p. 460, line 6 from the top
1986 edition p. 375, line 868
———————————FIRST WATCH
The King versus Bloom. Call the woman Driscoll.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 349, line 6 from the top:
“[In the heliotropical noughttime following a fade of transformed Tuff and, pending its viseversion, a metenergic reflow of beaming Batt, the bairdboard bombardment screen, if taste fully taut guranium satin, tends to teleframe and step up to the charge of a light barricade.


09/09/2017

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 431, line 27 from the top
1961 edition p. 455, top of page
1986 edition p. 371, line 717
———————————FIRST WATCH
Come. Name and address.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 348, line 29 from the top:
TAFF (who still senses that heavinscent houroines that enter trained him who they were sinuorivals from the sunny Espionia but plied wopsy with his wallets in thatthack of the bustle Bakerloo, (11.32), passing the uninational truthbosh in smoothing irony over the multinotcheralled infructuosities of his grinner set). The rib, the rib, the quean of oldbyrdes, Sinya Sonyavitches!”


09/02/2017

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 429, line 9 from the top
1961 edition p. 452, line 4 from the top
1986 edition p. 369, line 634
———————————BLOOM
Wildgoose chase this. Disorderly houses. Lord knows where they are gone. Drunks cover distance double quick.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 347, line 27 from the top:
“From them banjopeddlars on the raid. Kidding up me anti vanillas and getting off the stissas me aunties.”


08/26/2017

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 427, line 13 from the top
1961 edition p. 450, line 6 from the top
1986 edition p. 367, line 583
———————————THE GAFFER
(crouches, his voice twisted in his snout) And when Cairns came down from the scaffolding in Beaver street what was he after doing it into only into the bucket of porter that was there waiting on the shavings for Derwan’s plasterers.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 346, line 32 from the top:
BUTT (who in the cushlows of his goodsforseeking hoarth, ever fondlinger of his pimple spurk, is a niallist of the ninth home homestages, the babybell in his baggutstract upper going off allatwanst, begad, lest he should challenge himself, beygoad, till anguish). Horrasure, toff!”


08/19/2017

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 424, line 25 from the top
1961 edition p. 447, line 5 from the top
1986 edition p. 365, line 506
“(Bald Pat, bothered beetle, stands on the curbstone, folding his napkin, waiting to wait.)“

Finnegans Wake
p. 346, line 14 from the top:
TAFF (now as he has been past the buckthurnstock from Peadhar Piper of Colliguchuna, whiles they all are bealting pots to dubrin din for old daddam dombstom to tomb and wamb humbs lumps agamb, glimpse agam, glance agen, rise up road and hive up hill, and find your pollyvoulley foncey pitchin ingles in the parler). Since you are on for versingrhetorish say your piece!


08/12/2017

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 422, line 8 from the top
1961 edition p. 444, line 4 from the top
1986 edition p. 362, line 427
———————————BLOOM
(with a sour tenderish smile) A little frivol, shall we, if you are so inclined? Would you like me perhaps to embrace you just for a fraction of a second?”

Finnegans Wake
p. 345, line 34 from the top:
“[The other foregotthened abbosed in the Mullingaria are during this swishingsight teilweisioned. How the fictionable world in Fruzian Creamtartery is loading off heavy furses and affubling themselves with muckinstushes.


08/05/2017

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 419, line 25 from the top
1961 edition p. 441, line 13 from the top
1986 edition p. 360, line 361
(She points. In the gap of her dark den furtive, rainbedraggled, Bridie Kelly stands.)

Finnegans Wake
p. 345, line 26 from the top:
BUTT (he whipedoff’s his chimbley phot, as lips lovecurling to the tongueopener, he takecups the communion of sense at the hands of the foregiver of trosstpassers and thereinofter centelinnates that potifex miximhost with haruspical hospedariaty proferring into his pauses somewhot salt bacon).


07/29/2017

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 416, line 9 from the top
1961 edition p. 437, line 11 from the top
1986 edition p. 357, line 247
(The retriever approaches sniffing, nose to the ground. A sprawled form sneezes. A stooped bearded figure appears garbed in the long caftan of an elder in Zion and a smokingcap with magenta tassels. Horned spectacles hang down at the wings of the nose. Yellow poison streaks are on the drawn face.)

Finnegans Wake
p. 345, line 4 from the top:
TAFF (as a marrer off act, prepensing how such waldmanns from Burnias seduced country clowns, he is preposing barangaparang after going knowing what he is doing after to see him pluggy well moidered as a murder effect, you bet your blowie knife, before he doze soze, sopprused though he is) Grot Zot! You hidn’t the hurts? Vott Fonn!


07/22/2017

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 413, line 10 from the top
1961 edition p. 434, line 11 from the top
1986 edition p. 354, line 155
(He disappears into Olhausen’s, the porkbutcher’s, under the downcoming rollshutter. A few moments later he emerges from under the shutter, puffing Poldy, blowing Bloohoom.

Finnegans Wake
p. 344, line 8 from the top:
BUTT (giving his scimmianised twinge in acknuckledownedgment of this cumulikick, strafe from the firetrench, studenly drobs led, satoniseels ouchyotchy, he changecors induniforms as he is lefting the gat out of the big: his face glows green, his hair greys white, his bleyes bcome broon to suite his cultic twalette).


07/15/2017

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 411, line 15 from the top
1961 edition p. 432, line 11 from the top
1986 edition p. 353, line 99
“(He flourishes his ashplant, shivering the lamp image, shattering light over the world. A liver and white spaniel on the prowl slinks after him, growling. Lynch scares it with a kick.)“

Finnegans Wake
p. 343, line 25 from the top:
“Foinn duhans! I grandthinked after his obras after another time about the itch in his egondoom he was legging boldylugged from some pulversporochs…”


07/08/2017

Ulysses – (new chapter)
1922 edition p. 408 \
1961 edition p. 429 – top of page
1986 edition p. 350 /
(The Mabbot street entrance of nighttown, before which stretches an uncobbled tramsiding set with skeleton tracks, red and green will-o’-the-wisps and danger signals…

Finnegans Wake
p. 343, line 13 from the top:
BUTT (slinking his coatsleeves surdout over his squad mutton shoulder so as to loop more life the jauntlyman as he scents the anggreget yup behound their whole scoopchina’s desperate noy’s tutelage…


07/01/2017

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 406, top of page
1961 edition p. 427, line 17 from the top
1986 edition p. 348, line 1546
“‘Golly, whatten tunket’s yon guy in the mackintosh?”

Finnegans Wake
p. 342, line 33 from the top:
TAFF (awary that the first sports report of London Reginald has now been afterthoughtfully colliberated by a sagging spurts flash, takes the dipper end direction…


06/17/2017

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 405, top of page
1961 edition p. 426, line 12 from the top
1986 edition p. 347, line 1507
“‘Tis, sure. What say? In the speakeasy. Tight. I shee you, shir. Bantam, two days teetee. Bowsing nowt but claretwine.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 342, line 6 from the top:
Baldawl the curse, baledale the day! And the frocks of shick sheeples in their shummering insamples!


06/10/2017

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 403, line 34 from the top
1961 edition p. 425, line 6 from the top
1986 edition p. 346, line 1465
“Query. Who’s astanding this here do? Proud possessor of damnall. Declare misery. Bet to the ropes. Me nantee saltee. Not a red at me this week gone.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 341, line 18 from the top:
“[Up to this curkscraw bind an admirable verbivocovisual presentment of the worldrenownced Caerholme Event has been being given by The Irish Race and World.”


06/03/2017

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 401, line 25 from the top
1961 edition p. 422, line 29 from the top
1986 edition p. 344, line 1379
“Mark this farther and remember. The end comes suddenly. Enter that antechamber of birth where the studious are assembled and note their faces.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 340, line 25 from the top:
TAFF (whatwidth the psychophannies at the front and whetwadth the psuckofumbers beholden the fair, illcertain, between his bulchrichudes and the roshashanaral, where he sees Bishop Ribboncake plus his pollex prized going forth on his visitations of mirrage or Miss Horizon, justso all our fannacies daintied her, on the curve of the camber, unsheathing a showlaced limbaloft to the great consternations). Divulge!”


05/27/2017

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 399, line 33 from the top
1961 edition p. 420, line 30 from the top
1986 edition p. 343, line 1310
“Meanwhile the skill and patience of the physician had brought about a happy accouchement.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 340, line 13 from the top:
TAFF (a blackseer, he stroves to regulect all the straggles for wife in the rut of the past through the widnows in effigies keening after the blank sheets in their faminy to the relix of old decency from over draught). Oh day of rath!”


05/13/2017

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 397, top of page
1961 edition p. 417, line 22 from the top
1986 edition p. 340, line 1198
“The debate which ensued was in its scope and progress an epitome of the course of life.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 339, line 18 from the top:
TAFF (all Perssiasterssias shookatnaratatattar at his waggonhorchers, his bulgeglarying stargapers razzledazzlingly full of eyes, full of balls, full of holes, full of buttons, full of stains, full of medals, full of blickblackblobs). Grozarktic! Toadlebens!”


05/06/2017

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 393, line 34 from the top
1961 edition p. 414, line 3 from the top
1986 edition p. 338, line 1078
“The voices blend and fuse in clouded silence: silence that is the infinite of space: and swiftly, silently the soul is wafted over regions of cycles of generations that have lived.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 338, line 34 from the top:
BUTT (drawling forth from his blousom whereis meditabound of his minkerstary, switches on his gorsecopper’s fling weitoheito lang­thorn, fed up the grain oils of Aerin, while his laugh neighs banck as that flashermind’s rays and his lipponease longuewedge rambles). Ullahbluh!”


04/29/2017

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 392, line 7 from the top
1961 edition p. 412, line 5 from the top
1986 edition p. 336, line 1010
“But Malachias’ tale began to freeze them with horror. He conjured up the scene before them. The secret panel beside the chimney slid back and in the recess appeared – Haines!”

Finnegans Wake
p. 338, line 22 from the top:
“Sling Stranaslang, how Malo­razzias spikes her, coining a speak a spake!”


04/22/2017

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 390, line 16 from the top
1961 edition p. 410, line 7 from the top
1986 edition p. 335, line 942
“The news was imparted with a circumspection recalling the ceremonial usage of the Sublime Porte by the second female infirmarian to the junior medical officer in residence, who in his turn announced to the delegation that an heir had been born.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 338, line 15 from the top:
TAFF (porumptly helping himself out by the cesspull with a yellup yurrup, puts up his furry furzed hare). Butly bitly!”


04/15/2017

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 387, line 35 from the top
1961 edition p. 407, line 15 from the top
1986 edition p. 333, line 845
“To revert to Mr Bloom who, after his first entry, had been conscious of some impudent mocks which he however had borne with as being the fruits of that age upon which it is commonly charged that it knows not pity.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 337, line 15 from the top:
“Simply. As says the mug in the middle, nay brian nay noel, ney billy ney boney.”


04/08/2017

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 382, line 37 from the top
1961 edition p. 401, line 31 from the top
1986 edition p. 328, line 651
“Our worthy acquaintance Mr Malachi Mulligan now appeared in the doorway as the students were finishing their apologue…”

Finnegans Wake
p. 336, line 33 from the top:
“All to which not a lot snapped The Nolan of the Calabashes at his whilom eweheart photognomist who by this sum taken…”


04/01/2017

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 379, line 33 from the top
1961 edition p. 398, line 10 from the top
1986 edition p. 326, line 529
“With this came up Lenehan to the feet of the table to say how the letter was in that night’s gazette and he made a show to find it about him…”

Finnegans Wake
p. 336, line 8 from the top:
“And they pled him beheighten the firing. Dope.”


03/25/2017

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 376, line 27 from the top
1961 edition p. 394, line 32 from the top
1986 edition p. 323, line 408
“A black crack of noise in the street here, alack, bawled back. Loud on left Thor thundered: in anger awful the hammerhurler.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 335, line 24 from the top:
“—Paud the roosky, weren’t they all of them then each in his different way of saying calling on the one in the same time hibernian knights underthaner that was having…”


03/18/2017

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 374, line 13 from the top
1961 edition p. 392, line 4 from the top
1986 edition p. 321, line 313
“Hereupon Punch Costello dinged with his fist upon the board and would sing a bawdy catch Staboo Stabella about a wench that was put in pod of a jolly swashbuckler in Almany which he did straightways now attack:
—The first three months she was not well, Staboo

Finnegans Wake
p. 334, line 20 from the top:
“O rum it is the chomicalest thing how it pickles up the punches and the jude.”


03/11/2017

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 373, line 16 from the top
1961 edition p. 391, line 3 from the top
1986 edition p. 320, line 277
“About that present time young Stephen filled all cups that stood empty so as there remained but little mo…”

Finnegans Wake
p. 333, line 22 from the top:
“(pierce me, hunky, I’m full of meunders!)”


03/04/2017

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 370, line 20 from the top
1961 edition p. 387, line 35 from the top
1986 edition p. 317, line 167
“This meanwhile this good sister stood by the door and begged them at the reverence of Jesu our alther liege Lord to leave their wassailing for there was above one quick with child, a gentle dame, whose time hied fast.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 332, line 36 from the top:
“Enterruption. Check or slowback. Dvershen.”


02/25/2017

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 368, line 4 from the top
1961 edition p. 385, line 3 from the top
1986 edition p. 315, line 71
“Some man that wayfaring was stood by housedoor at night’s oncoming.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 332, line 10 from the top:
“Such was the act of goth stepping the tolk of Doolin, drain and plantage, wattle and daub, with you’ll peel as I’ll pale and we’ll pull the boath toground together…”


02/18/2017

Ulysses – (new chapter)
1922 edition p. 366\
1961 edition p. 383 – top of page
1986 edition p. 314/
“Deshil Holles Eamus. Deshil Holles Eamus. Deshil Holles Eamus.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 332, top of page:
“Snip snap snoody. Noo err historyend goody. Of a lil trip trap and a big treeskooner for he put off the ketyl and they made three (for fie!) and if hec dont love alpy then lad you annoy me.”


02/11/2017

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 364, line 28 from the top
1961 edition p. 382, line 20 from the top
1986 edition p. 313, line 1286
“A bat flew. Here. There. Here. Far in the grey a bell chimed. Mr Bloom with open mouth, his left boot sanded sideways, leaned, breathed. Just for a few

Cuckoo.”
Cuckoo.”
Cuckoo.

Finnegans Wake
p. 331, line 14 from the top:
“So in the names of the balder and of the sol and of the hollichrost…”


02/04/2017

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 362, line 32 from the top
1961 edition p. 380, line 18 from the top
1986 edition p. 311, line 1211
“Better not stick here all night like a limpet.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 330, line 33 from the top:
“The kilder massed, one then and uhindred, (harefoot, birdy­hands, herringabone, beesknees), and they barneydansked a kathareen round to know the who and to show the howsome.”


01/28/2017

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 362, line 4 from the top
1961 edition p. 379, line 25 from the top
1986 edition p. 310, line 1182
“Life those chaps out there must have, stuck in the same spot.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 330, line 12 from the top:
“Thus street spins legends while wharves woves tales but some family fewd felt a nick in their name.”


01/21/2017

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 361, line 3 from the top
1961 edition p. 378, line 19 from the top
1986 edition p. 309, line 1143
“Ba. Who knows what they’re always flying for. Insects?”

Finnegans Wake
p. 329, line 28 from the top:
“And as owfally posh with his halfcrown jool as if he was the Granjook Meckl or Paster de Grace on the Route de l’Epée.”


01/14/2017

Uysses
1922 edition p. 359, line 17 from the top
1961 edition p. 376, line 29 from the top
1986 edition p. 308, line 1081
“Dew falling. Bad for you, dear, to sit on that stone. Brings on white fluxions. Never have little baby then less he was big strong fight his way up through. Might get piles myself.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 329, line 14 from the top:
“And Dub did glow that night. In Fingal of victories. Cannmatha and Cathlin sang together. And the three shouters of glory.”


01/07/2017

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 358, line 27 from the top
1961 edition p. 375, line 38 from the top
1986 edition p. 307, line 1053
“Here’s this nobleman passed before. Blown in from the bay. Just went as far as turn back.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 328, line 19 from the top:
“(whiles the breath of Huppy Hullespond swumped in his seachest for to renumber all the mallymedears’ long roll and call of sweetheart emmas that every had a port in from Coxenhagen till the brottels on the Nile)”


12/31/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 356, line 33 from the top
1961 edition p. 373, line 38 from the top
1986 edition p. 306, line 982
“Other hand a sixfooter with a wifey up to his watchpocket. Long and the short of it. Big he and little she.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 327, line 17 from the top:
“…making every Dinny dingle after her down the Dargul dale…”


12/24/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 355, line 35 from the top
1961 edition p. 372, line 38 from the top
1986 edition p. 305, line 947
Her maiden name was Jemina Brown
And she lived with her mother in Irishtown.

Finnegans Wake
p. 326, line 35 from the top:
“(whiles the heart of Lukky Swayn slaughed in his icebox for to think of all the sports of smukklers he would behave in juteyfrieze being forelooper to her)”


12/17/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 354, line 22 from the top
1961 edition p. 371, line 18 from the top
1986 edition p. 304, line 894
“There she is with them down there for the fireworks. My fireworks.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 326, line 21 from the top:
“—Nansense, you snorsted?”


12/10/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 353, line 18 from the top
1961 edition p. 370, line 9 from the top
1986 edition p. 303, line 851
“Mr Bloom with careful hand recomposed his wet shirt. O Lord, that little limping devil. Begins to feel cold and clammy.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 326, line 4 from the top:
“A Trinity judge will crux your boom. Pat is the man for thy. Ay ay!”


12/03/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 352, line 26 from the top
1961 edition p. 369, line 17 from the top
1986 edition p. 302, line 822
“Devils they are when that’s coming on them. Dark devilish appearance.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 325, line 13 from the top:
“—Comither, ahorace, thou mighty man of valour, elderman adaptive of Capel Ysnod…”


11/26/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 350, line 34 from the top
1961 edition p. 367, line 20 from the top
1986 edition p. 301, line 754
“Cissy Caffrey whistled, imitating the boys in the football field to show what a great person she was…”

Finnegans Wake
p. 325, line 4 from the top:
“Art thou gainous sense uncompetite! Limited. Anna Lynchya Pourable!”


11/19/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 346, line 26 from the top
1961 edition p. 362, line 33 from the top
1986 edition p. 297, line 591
“Her words rang out crystalclear, more musical than the cooing of the ringdove, but they cut the silence icily.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 324, line 18 from the top:
“Rowdiose wodhalooing. Theirs is one lesson less message for good and truesirs.”


11/12/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 344, line 33 from the top
1961 edition p. 360, line 34 from the top
1986 edition p. 295, line 521
“Edy Boardman was noticing it too because she was squinting at Gerty, half smiling, with her specs like an old maid, pretending to nurse the baby.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 324, line 2 from the top:
“With the old sit in his shoulders, and the new satin atlas onder his uxter, erning his breadth to the swelt of his proud…”


11/05/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 343, line 18 from the top
1961 edition p. 359, line 10 from the top
1986 edition p. 294, line 466
“The exasperating little brats of twins began to quarrel again and Jacky threw the ball out towards the sea and they both ran after it.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 323, line 10 from the top:
“One can smell off his wetsments how he is coming from a beach of promisck.”


10/29/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 341, line 11 from the top
1961 edition p. 356, line 34 from the top
1986 edition p. 292, line 381
“The twins were now playing again right merrily for the troubles of childhood are but as fleeting summer showers.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 322, line 30 from the top:
“—That’s fag for fig, methinks…”


10/22/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 339, line 9 from the top
1961 edition p. 354, line 26 from the top
1986 edition p. 291, line 303
“And still the voices sang in supplication to the Virgin most powerful, Virgin most merciful.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 322, line 16 from the top:
“—And, haikon or hurlin, who did you do at doyle today, my horsey dorksey gentryman.”


10/15/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 336, line 7 from the top
1961 edition p. 351, line 11 from the top
1986 edition p. 288, line 188
“And yet – and yet! That strained look on her face! A gnawing sorrow is there all the time.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 321, line 20 from the top:
“Business. His bestness. Copeman helpen.”


10/08/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 334, line 19 from the top
1961 edition p. 349, line 20 from the top
1986 edition p. 286, line 123
“For an instant she was silent with rather sad downcast eyes.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 320, line 33 from the top:
“Infernal machinery (serial number: Bullysacre, dig care a dig)”


10/01/2016

Ulysses – (new chapter)
1922 edition p. 331 \
1961 edition p. 346 — top of page
1986 edition p. 284 /
“The summer evening had begun to fold the world in its mysterious embrace.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 320, line 23 from the top:
“—Stuff, Taaffe, stuff! interjoked it his wife’s hopesend to the boath of them consistently. Come back to May Aileen.”


09/24/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 326, line 10 from the top
1961 edition p. 341, top of page
1986 edition p. 277, line 1751
“—And so say all of us, says Jack.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 320, line 10 from the top:
“I will put his fleas of wood in the flour, and he sagd, behunt on the oatshus, the not well made one…”


09/17/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 322, line 32 from the top
1961 edition p. 337, line 14 from the top
1986 edition p. 276, line 1621
“So in comes Martin asking where was Bloom.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 319, line 32 from the top:
“—Smoke and coke choke!”


09/10/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 320, line 22 from the top
1961 edition p. 334, line 34 from the top
1986 edition p. 274, line 1534
“—Widow woman, says Ned. I wouldn’t doubt her. Wonder did he put that bible to the same use as I would.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 319, line 20 from the top:
“—And be the coop of his gobbos, Reacher the Thaurd, thinks your girth fatter, apopo of his buckseaseilers, but where’s Horace’s courtin troopsers?”


09/03/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 318, line 27 from the top
1961 edition p. 332, line 28 from the top
1986 edition p. 273, line 1465
“—Show us over the drink, says I. Which is which?
“—That’s mine, says Joe, as the devil said to the dead policeman.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 319, line 3 from the top:
“—I shot be shoddied, throttle me, fine me cowheel for ever, usquebauched the ersewild aleconner, for bringing briars to Bem­bracken…”


08/27/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 316, line 15 from the top
1961 edition p. 330, line 9 from the top
1986 edition p. 270, line 1376
“—Perfectly true, says Bloom. But my point was ….”

Finnegans Wake
p. 318, line 33 from the top:
“But his spectrem onlymergeant crested from the irised sea in plight…”


08/20/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 314, line 10 from the top
1961 edition p. 327, line 37 from the top
1986 edition p. 269, line 1229
“—And our eyes are on Europe, says the citizen.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 318, line 28 from the top:
“If the flowers of speech valed the springs of me rising the hiker I hilltapped the murk I mist my blezzard way.”


08/13/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 312, line 5 from the top
1961 edition p. 325, line 27 from the top
1986 edition p. 267, line 1215
“—What’s up with you, says I to Lenehan. You look like a fellow that had lost a bob and found a tanner.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 318, line 15 from the top:
“Through simpling years where the lowcasts have aten of amilikan honey and datish fruits and a bannock of barley on Tham the Thatcher’s palm.”


08/06/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 310, line 28 from the top
1961 edition p. 324, line 11 from the top
1986 edition p. 266, line 1163
“—A dishonoured wife, says the citizen, that’s what’s the cause of all our misfortunes.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 317, line 29 from the top:
“Place the scaurs wore on your groot big bailey bill, he apullajibed…”


07/30/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 308, line 24 from the top
1961 edition p. 322, line 3 from the top
1986 edition p. 264, line 1084
“—How did that Canada swindle case go off? says Joe.
“—Remanded, says J. J.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 317, line 12 from the top:
“Allahballah!”


07/23/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 304, line 32 from the top
1961 edition p. 318, line 6 from the top
1986 edition p. 261, line 939
“—Talking about violent exercise, says Alf, were you at that Keogh-Bennett match?”

Finnegans Wake
p. 316, line 33 from the top:
“So sell me gundy, sagd the now waging cappon, with a warry posthumour’s expletion, shoots ogos shootsle him or where’s that slob?”


07/16/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 301, line 22 from the top
1961 edition p. 314, line 30 from the top
1986 edition p. 258, line 817
“So Terry brought the three pints.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 316, line 21 from the top:
“Morya Mortimor! Allapalla overus! Howoft had the ballshee tried!”


07/09/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 300, line 23 from the top
1961 edition p. 313, line 27 from the top
1986 edition p. 257, line 780
“So Bob Doran comes lurching around asking Bloom to tell Mrs Dignam he was sorry for her trouble and he was very sorry about the funeral and to tell her that he said and everyone who knew him said that there was never a truer, a finer than poor little Willy that’s dead to tell her.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 316, line 6 from the top:
“And for landlord, noting, nodding, a coast to moor was cause to mear.”


07/02/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 297, line 34 from the top
1961 edition p. 310, line 39 from the top
1986 edition p. 255, line 679
“So then the citizen begins talking about the Irish language and the corporation meeting and all to that and the shoneens that can’t speak their own language and…”

Finnegans Wake
p. 315, line 34 from the top:
“—Skibbereen has common inn, by pounautique, with poke­way paw, and sadder raven evermore, telled shinshanks lauwering frankish for his kicker…”


06/18 and 06/25/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 293, line 36 from the top
1961 edition p. 306, line 24 from the top
1986 edition p. 251, line 525
“The last farewell was affecting in the extreme.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 315, line 16 from the top:
“He’d left his stickup in his hand to show them none ill feeling.”


06/11/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 290, line 31 from the top
1961 edition p. 303, line 12 from the top
1986 edition p. 249, line 407
“Old Garryowen started growling again at Bloom that was skeezing round the door.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 315, line 9 from the top:
“Burniface, shiply efter, shoply after, at an angle of lag, let flow, brabble brabble and brabble, and so hostily, heavyside breathing, came up with them and, check me joule, shot the three tailors…”


06/04/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 285, line 20 from the top
1961 edition p. 297, line 28 from the top
1986 edition p. 244, line 206
“So anyhow Terry brought the three pints Joe was standing and begob the sight nearly left my eyes when I saw him land out a quid. O, as true as I’m telling you. A goodlooking sovereign.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 314, line 30 from the top:
“—That’s all murtagh purtagh but whad ababs his dopter?”


05/28/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 283, line 11 from the top
1961 edition p. 295, line 11 from the top
1986 edition p. 242, line 118
“So we turned into Barney Kiernan’s and there, sure enough, was the citizen up in the corner having a great confab with himself and that bloody mangy mongrel, Garryowen, and he waiting for what the sky would drop in the way of drink.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 314, line 18 from the top:
“Hillary rillarry gibbous grist to our millery!”


05/21/2016

Ulysses – (new chapter)
1922 edition p. 280 \
1961 edition p. 292 – top
1986 edition p. 240 /
“I was just passing the time of day with old Troy of the D. M. P. at the corner of Arbour hill there and be damned but a bloody sweep came along and he near drove his gear into my eye.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 314, line 8 from the top:
“Both­all­chor­ac­tors­chum­min­a­round­gan­sum­um­in­a­rum­drum­strum­trum­in­a­hump­ta­dump­waul­to­poo­foo­loo­der­a­maun­stur­nup!”


05/14/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 277, line 22 from the top
1961 edition p. 289, line 20 from the top
1986 edition p. 237, line 1228
“But for example the chap that wallops the big drum.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 313, line 29 from the top:
“Thus as count the costs of liquid courage, a bullyon gauger, stowed stivers pengapung in bulk in hold…”


05/07/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 275, line 20 from the top
1961 edition p. 287, line 18 from the top
1986 edition p. 236, line 1151
“Ben Dollard bulkily cachuchad towards the bar, mightily praisefed and all big roseate, on heavyfooted feet, his gouty fingers nakkering castagnettes in the air.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 313, line 14 from the top:
“Whereofter, behest his suzerain law the Thing and the pilsener had the baar, Recknar Jarl, (they called him Roguenor, Irl call him)…”


04/30/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 274, line 8 from the top
1961 edition p. 286, top of page
1986 edition p. 234, line 1097
“With hoarse rude fury the yeoman cursed, swelling in apoplectic bitch’s bastard. A good thought, boy, to come. One hour’s your time to live, your last.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 312, line 31 from the top:
“Group drinkards maaks grope thinkards or how reads rotary, jewr of a chrestend, respecting the otherdogs churchees, so long plubs will be plebs but plabs by low frequency amplification may later agree to have another.”


04/23/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 273, line 11 from the top
1961 edition p. 285, top of page
1986 edition p. 234, line 1063
“All gone. All fallen. At the siege of Ross his father, at Gorey all his brothers fell. To Wexford, we are the boys of Wexford, he would. Last of his name and race.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 312, line 17 from the top:
“But old sporty, as endth lord, in ryehouse reigner, he nought feared crimp or cramp of shore sharks, plotsome to getsome.”


04/16/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 272, line 5 from the top
1961 edition p. 283, line 31 from the top
1986 edition p. 234, line 1063
“The voice of warning, solemn warning, told them the youth had entered a lonely hall, told them how solemn fell his footsteps there, told them the gloomy chamber, the vested priest sitting to shrive.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 312, line 13 from the top:
“—Hump! Hump! bassed the broaders-in-laugh with a quick piddysnip that wee halfbit a second.”


04/09/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 271, line 3 from the top
1961 edition p. 282, line 27 from the top
1986 edition p. 232, line 979
“O, look we are so! Chamber music. Could make a kind of pun on that. It is a kind of music I often thought when she. Acoustics that is. Tinkling.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 311, line 31 from the top:
“He spit in his faist (beggin): he tape the raw baste (paddin): he planked his pledge (as dib is a dab): and he tog his fringe sleeve (buthock lad, fur whale).”


04/02/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 270, line 24 from the top
1961 edition p. 282, line 8 from the top
1986 edition p. 231, line 963
“Sea, wind, leaves, thunder, waters, cows lowing, the cattlemarket, cocks, hens don’t crow, snakes hissss.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 311, line 21 from the top:
“—Then sagd he to the ship’s husband. And in his translaten­tic norjankeltian.”


03/26/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 269, line 30 from the top
1961 edition p. 281, line 16 from the top
1986 edition p. 231, line 930
“Ah, now he heard, she holding it to his ear. Hear! He heard. Wonderful. She held it to her own. And through the sifted light pale gold in contrast glided. To hear.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 311, line 5 from the top:
“It was long after once there was a lealand in the luffing…”


03/19/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 268, line 23 from the top
1961 edition p. 280, line 3 from the top
1986 edition p. 230, line 888
“Bloom mur: best references. But Henry wrote: it will excite me.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 310, line 22 from the top:
“House of call is all their evenbreads though its cartomance hallucinate like an erection in the night…”


03/12/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 267, line 29 from the top
1961 edition p. 279, line 3 from the top
1986 edition p. 229, line 854
“Sour pipe removed he held a shield of hand beside his lips that cooed a moonlight nightcall, clear from anear, a call from afar, replying.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 310, line 14 from the top:
“…the Brythyc Symmonds Guild, the Ropemakers Reunion, the Variagated Peddlars Barringoy Bni­brthirhd, the Askold Olegsonder Crowds of the O’Keef-Rosses ant Rhosso-Keevers of Zastwoking, the Ligue of Yahooth o.s.v. …”


03/05/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 266, line 26 from the top
1961 edition p. 277, line 25 from the top
1986 edition p. 228, line 813
“Miss Douce withdrew her satiny arm, reproachful, pleased.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 310, line 8 from the top:
“They finally caused, or most leastways brung it about somehows, (that) the pip of the lin (to) pinnatrate inthro an auricular forfickle…”


02/27/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 265, line 13 from the top
1961 edition p. 276, line 17 from the top
1986 edition p. 227, line 761
“Blazes Boylan’s smart tan shoes creaked on the barfloor, said before. Jingle by monuments of sir John Gray, Horatio onehandled Nelson, reverend father Theobald Mathew, jaunted, as said before just now.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 310, top of page:
“This harmonic condenser enginium (the Mole) they caused to be worked from a magazine battery…”


02/20/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 262, line 11 from the top
1961 edition p. 273, line 14 from the top
1986 edition p. 225, line 693
“Alas the voice rose, sighing, changed: loud, full, shining, proud.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 309, line 13 from the top (mid-sentence):
“…forced in their waste, and as for Ibdullin what of Himana…”


02/13/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 262, line 11 from the top
1961 edition p. 273, line 14 from the top
1986 edition p. 224, line 650
“Piano again. Sounds better than last time I heard. Tuned probably. Stopped again.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 309, line 8 from the top (mid-sentence):
“…allatheses, with perhelps the prop of a prompt to them, was now or never in Etheria Deserta…”


02/06/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 260, line 20 from the top
1961 edition p. 271, line 22 from the top
1986 edition p. 223, line 584
“—Ah, I couldn’t, man, Mr Dedalus said, shy, listless.”

Finnegans Wake
New Chapter – p. 309, top of the page:
“It may not or maybe a no concern of the Guinnesses but.”


01/30/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 257, line 35 from the top
1961 edition p. 268, line 34 from the top
1986 edition p. 221, line 483
“Father Cowley blushed to his brilliant purply lobes.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 308, top right-hand margin:
“MAWMAW, LUK, YOUR BEEFTAY’S FIZZIN OVER!”


01/23/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 256, line 21 from the top
1961 edition p. 267, line 13 from the top
1986 edition p. 219, line 430
“—Come on to blazes, said Blazes Boylan, going.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 307, line 24 from the top:
“The Value of Circumstantial Evidence”


01/16/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 255, line 15 from the top
1961 edition p. 266, line 7 from the top
1986 edition p. 218, line 387
“Lenehan, small eyes ahunger on her humming, bust humming, tugged Blazes Boylan’s elbowsleeve.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 307, line 14 from the top:
“Tell a Friend in a Chatty Letter the Fable of the Grasshopper and the Ant”


01/09/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 253, line 34 from the top
1961 edition p. 264, line 30 from the top
1986 edition p. 217, line 331
“She rose and closed her reading, rose of Castile: fretted, forlorn, dreamily rose.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 307, line 7 from the top:
“Why we all Love our Little Lord Mayor”


01/02/2016

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 253, line 11 from the top
1961 edition p. 264, line 4 from the top
1986 edition p. 217, line 306
“—Twopence, sir, the shopgirl dared to say.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 307, line 2 from the top:
“When is a Pun not a Pun?”


12/26/2015

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 251, line 35 from the top
1961 edition p. 262, line 26 from the top
1986 edition p. 215, line 253
“He greeted Mr Dedalus and got a nod.
—Greetings from the famous son of a famous father.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 306, 7th footnote:
“Rarely equal and distinct in all things.”


12/19/2015

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 250, line 5 from the top
1961 edition p. 260, line 37 from the top
1986 edition p. 214, line 185
“By Cantwell’s offices roved Greaseabloom, by Ceppi’s virgins, bright of their oils.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 306, 3rd footnote:
“R.C., disengaged, good character, would help, no salary.”


12/12/2015

Ulysses – (new chapter)
1922 edition p. 245\
1961 edition p. 256 – top
1986 edition p. 210 /
“Bronze by gold heard the hoofirons, steelyringing.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 306, right-hand margin:
“ENTER THE COP AND HOW. SECURES GUBERNANT URBIS TERROREM.”


12/05/2015

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 242, line 3 from the top
1961 edition p. 252, line 3 from the top
1986 edition p. 207, line 1175
“William Humble, earl of Dudley, and lady Dudley, accompanied by lieutenantcolonel Heseltine, drove out after luncheon from the viceregal lodge.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 305, line 25 from the top:
“Bide in your hush! Bide in your hush, do! The law does not aloud you to shout.”


11/21/2015

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 238, line 15 from the top
1961 edition p. 249, line 37 from the top
1986 edition p. 205, line 1101
“Almidano Artifoni walked past Holles street, past Sewell’s yard.”

11/14/2015

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 236, line 3 from the top
1961 edition p. 246, top of page
1986 edition p. 202, line 956
“—The youngster will be all right, Martin Cunningham said, as they passed out of the Castleyard gate.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 305, line 15 from the top:
“And if you’re not your bloater’s kipper may I never curse again on that pint I took of Jamesons.”


11/07/2015

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 234, top of page
1961 edition p. 243, line 34 from the top
1986 edition p. 200, line 881
“—Hello, Simon, Father Cowley said. How are things?
“—Hello, Bob, old man, Mr Dedalus answered, stopping.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 305, top right margin:
“COME SI COMPITA CUNCTITI­TITILATIO? CONKERY CUNK, THIGH-THIGHT-TICKELLY-THIGH, LIG­GERILAG, TITTERITOT, LEG IN A TEE, LUG IN A LAW, TWO AT A TIE, THREE ON A THRICKY TILL OHIO OHIO IOIOMISS.”


10/31/2015

Dubliners (special Hallow’s Eve reading)
10th story, “Clay” – beginning:
“The matron had given her leave to go out as soon as the women’s tea was over, and Maria looked forward to her evening out.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 304, 3rd footnote:
“Wipe your glosses with what you know.”


10/24/2015

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 232, line 27 from the top
1961 edition p. 242, line 21 from the top
1986 edition p. 199, line 830
“Stephen went down Bedford row, the handle of the ash clacking against his shoulderblade.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 304, line 11 from the top:
“I’d love to take you for a bugaboo ride and play funfer all if you’d only sit and be the ballasted bottle in the porker barrel.”


10/17/2015

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 231, line 32 from the top
1961 edition p. 241, line 23 from the top
1986 edition p. 198, line 800
“Stephen Dedalus watched through the webbed window the lapidary’s fingers prove a timedulled chain.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 304, line 3 from the top:
“Formalisa. Loves deathhow simple!”


10/10/2015

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 227, line 23 from the top
1961 edition p. 237, line 6 from the top
1986 edition p. 195, line 642
“The lacquey by the door of Dillon’s auctionrooms shook his handbell twice again and viewed himself in the chalked mirror of the cabinet.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 303, line 20 from the top:
“…thee faroots hof cullchaw end ate citrawn woodint wun…”


10/03/2015

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 226, top of page
1961 edition p. 235, line 18 from the top
1986 edition p. 193, line 584
“Mr Bloom turned over idly pages of The Awful Disclosures of Maria Monk, then of Aristotle’s Masterpiece.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 303, second left-hand margin:
Conception of the Compromise and Finding of a Formula.


09/26/2015

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 222, line 32 from the top
1961 edition p. 232, line 4 from the top
1986 edition p. 191, line 465 (top of page)
“Tom Rochford took the top disk from the pile he clasped against his claret waistcoat.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 303, left-hand margin:
Force Centres of the Fire Serpen­tine: heart, throat, navel, spleen, sacral, fontanella, inter­temporal eye.


09/19/2015

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 220, line 6 from the top
1961 edition p. 228, line 13 from the top
1986 edition p. 188, line 368
“Miss Dunne hid the Capel street library copy of The Woman in White far back in her drawer and rolled a sheet of gaudy notepaper into her typewriter.”

Finnegans Wake
pp. 302-303, right-hand marginal note at bottom of 302, continued on 303:
“ALL SQUARE AND ACCORDING TO COCKER.”


09/05/2015

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 218, line 6 from the top
1961 edition p. 227, line 11 from the top
1986 edition p. 187, line 299
“The blond girl in Thornton’s bedded the wicker basket with rustling fibre.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 302, line 15 from the top:
“…watch him, having caught at the bi­furking calamum in his bolsillos…”


08/29/2015

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 216, line 6 from the top
1961 edition p. 225, line 15 from the top
1986 edition p. 185, line 228
“A onelegged sailor crutched himself round MacConnell’s corner, skirting Rabaiotti’s icecream car, and jerked himself up Eccles street. “

Finnegans Wake
p. 302, right marginal note:
“WHEN THE ANSWERER IS A LEMAN.”


08/22/2015

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 215, top of page
1961 edition p. 224, line 9 from the top
1986 edition p. 184, line 184
“Father Conmee, reading his office, watched a flock of muttoning clouds over Rathcoffey.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 302, top of page:
“Ann opes tipoo soon ear!”


08/15/2015

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 213, line 6 from the top
1961 edition p. 221, bottom of page
1986 edition p. 182, line 107
“On Newcomen bridge the very reverend John Conmee S. J. of saint Francis Xavier’s church, upper Gardiner street, stepped on to an outward bound tram.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 301, line 17 from the top:
“O jerry! He was soso, harriot all!”


08/08/2015

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 212, line 27 from the top
1961 edition p. 221, line 24 from the top
1986 edition p. 182, line 93
“Father Conmee went by Daniel Bergin’s publichouse against the window of which two unlabouring men lounged. They saluted him and were saluted.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 301, top of page:
“(Spry him! call a blood-lekar! Where’s Dr Brassenaarse?)”


08/01/2015

Ulysses – (new chapter)
1922 edition p. 211 \
1961 edition p. 219 — top of page:
1986 edition p. 180 /
“The superior, the very reverend John Conmee S. J. reset his smooth watch in his interior pocket as he came down the presbytery steps.”


07/25/2015

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 208, line 9 from the top
1961 edition p. 216, line 31 from the top
1986 edition p. 178, line 1167
“—I have conceived a play for the mummers, he said solemnly.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 300, line 24 from the top:
“…with his muffetee cuffes ownconsciously grafficking with his sinister cyclopes after trigamies and spirals’ wobbles…”


07/18/2015

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 206, line 21 from the top
1961 edition p. 215, line 7 from the top
1986 edition p. 176, line 1108
“One day in the national library we had a discussion. Shakes. After. His lub back: I followed. I gall his kibe.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 300, right-hand margin:
“SICK US A SOCK WITH SOME SEDI­MENT IN IT FOR THE SAKE OF OUR DARNING WIVES.”


07/11/2015

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 205, line 4 from the top
1961 edition p. 213, line 28 from the top
1986 edition p. 175, line 1053
“—Eureka! Buck Mulligan cried. Eureka!

Finnegans Wake
p. 299, line 29 from the top:
“More better twofeller we been speak copperads.”


06/27/2015

Finnegans Wake
p. 299, line 27 from the top:
“And be the powers of Moll Kelly, neigh­bour topsowyer, it will be a lozenge to me all my lauffe.”


06/13/2015

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 204, line 4 from the top
1961 edition p. 212, line 26 from the top
1986 edition p. 174, line 1016
“He laughed to free his mind from his mind’s bondage.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 299, second left-hand margin note:
Exclusivism: the Ors, Sors and Fors, which?


06/06/2015

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 202, line 15 from the top
1961 edition p. 210, line 35 from the top
1986 edition p. 173, line 952
“Fabulous artificer. The hawklike man. You flew. Whereto?”

Finnegans Wake
p. 299, line 13 from the top:
“But you’re holy mooxed and gaping up the wrong palce as if you was seeheeing the gheist that stays forenenst, you blessed simpletop dome fool!”


 05/30/2015

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 201, line 15 from the top
1961 edition p. 209, line 31 from the top
1986 edition p. 172, line 920
“STEPHEN (stringendo) He has hidden his own name, a fair name, William, in the plays, a super here, a clown there…”

Finnegans Wake
p. 299, left-hand margin:
“Canine Venus sublimated to Aulidic Aphrodite.”


05/09/2015

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 198, line 26 from the top
1961 edition p. 207, line 4 from the top
1986 edition p. 170, line 824
“Your own? He knows your old fellow. The widower.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 298, line 21 from the top:
“…orso, here is nowet badder than the sin of Aha with his cosin Lil…”


05/02/2015

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 197, line 6 from the top
1961 edition p. 205, line 19 from the top
1986 edition p. 168, line 768
“—A myriadminded man, Mr Best reminded. Coleridge called him myriadminded.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 298, line 18 from the top:
“Quarrellary.”


 04/25/2015

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 196, line 16 from the top
1961 edition p. 204, line 30 from the top
1986 edition p. 168, line 741
“—And the sense of property, Stephen said. He drew Shylock out of his own long pocket.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 297, line 27 from the top:
“(and why wouldn’t she sit cressloggedlike the lass that lured a tailor?)”


04/18/2015

Finnegans Wake
p. 297, line 20 from the top:
“…fastness firm of Hurdlebury Fenn…”


 04/11/2015

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 195, line 27 from the top
1961 edition p. 203, line 40 from the top
1986 edition p. 167, line 718
“—Antiquity mentions famous beds, Second Eglinton puckered, bedsmiling. Let me think.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 297, second note in the left-hand margin:
Prometheus or the Promise of Provision.


 04/04/2015

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 192, line 27 from the top
1961 edition p. 200, line 42 from the top
1986 edition p. 165, line 605
“—The sheeny! Buck Mulligan cried.”


03/28/2015

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 191, line 4 from the top
1961 edition p. 199, line 10 from the top
1986 edition p. 163, line 542
“—Do you think it is only a paradox? the quaker librarian was asking. The mocker is never taken seriously when he is most serious.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 296, line 22 from the top:
“Now, to com­pleat anglers, beloved biron­thiarn and hush­tokan hish­ta­katsch, join alfa pea and pull loose by dot­ties and, to be more spare­matic­ally logo­ical, eel­pie and pale­ale by trunk­les.”


 03/21/2015

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 189, line 24 from the top
1961 edition p. 197, line 28 from the top
1986 edition p. 162, line 492
“Brood of mockers: Photius, pseudo Malachi, Johann Most.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 296, first footnote:
“Parsee ffrench for the upholdsterer would be delightered.”


 03/14/2015

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 188, line 19 from the top
1961 edition p. 196, line 17 from the top
1986 edition p. 161, line 448
“He thous and thees her with grave husbandwords. Dost love, Miriam? Dost love thy man?”

Finnegans Wake
p. 295, line 13 from the top:
“Like when I dromed I was in Dairy and was wuckened up with thump in thudderdown.”


03/07/2015

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 187, line 34 from the top
1961 edition p. 195, line 33 from the top
1986 edition p. 160, line 421
“—Marina, Stephen said, a child of storm, Miranda, a wonder, Perdita, that which was lost.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 294, line 25 from the top:
“By his magmasine fall. Lumps, lavas and all.”


02/28/2015

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 187, line 15 from the top
1961 edition p. 195, line 10 from the top
1986 edition p. 160, line 400
“—If you want to know what are the events which cast their shadow over the hell of time of King Lear, Othello, Hamlet, Troilus and Cressida, look to see when and how the shadow lifts. What softens the heart of a man, shipwrecked in storms dire, Tried, like another Ulysses, Pericles, prince of Tyre?”


02/14/2015

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 186, line 30 from the top
1961 edition p. 194, line 23 from the top
1986 edition p. 159, line 376
“—As we, or mother Dana, weave and unweave our bodies, Stephen said, from day to day, their molecules shuttled to and fro, so does the artist weave and unweave his image.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 294, second left-hand margin:
Docetism and Didicism, Maya-Thaya. Tamas-Rajas-Sattvas.


02/07/2015

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 186, line 8 from the top
1961 edition p. 193, line 37 from the top
1986 edition p. 159, line 352
“Coffined thoughts around me, in mummycases, embalmed in spice of words.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 294, left-hand margin:
Sarga, or the path of outgoing.


01/31/2015

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 185, line 9 from the top
1961 edition p. 192, line 37 from the top
1986 edition p. 158, line 314
“Cordelia. Cordoglio. Lir’s loneliest daughter.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 293, bottom of page:
“Now (lens your dappled yeye here, mine’s presbyoperian, shill and wall)…”


01/24/2015

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 184, top of page
1961 edition p. 191, line 27 from the top
1986 edition p. 157, line 269
“A tall figure in bearded homespun rose from shadow and unveiled its cooperative watch.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 293, line 15 from the top:
“Given now ann linch you take enn all.”


01/17/2015

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 183, line 11 from the top
1961 edition p. 190, line 41 from the top
1986 edition p. 156, line 245
“—He had a good groatsworth of wit, Stephen said, and no truant memory.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 293, line 2 the top:
“…and in truth, as a poor soul is between shift and shift ere the death he has lived through becomes the life he is to die into…”


01/10/2015

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 182, line 28 from the top
1961 edition p. 190, line 17 from the top
1986 edition p. 156, line 225
“John Eglinton looked in the tangled glowworm of his lamp.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 293, right-hand margin note at the top:
“WHY MY AS LIKEWISE WHIS HIS”


01/03/2015

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 180, line 6 from the top
1961 edition p. 187, line 37 from the top
1986 edition p. 154, line 136
“Cranly, I his mute orderly, following battles from afar.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 292, line 22 from the top:
“…equally so, the crame of the whole faustian fustian, whether your launer’s lightsome or your soulard’s schwearmood…”


12/27/2014

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 178, line 15 from the top
1961 edition p. 185, line 33 from the top
1986 edition p. 152, line 74
“Mr Best entered, tall, young, mild, light. He bore in his hand with grace a notebook, new, large, clean, bright.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 292, line 12 from the top:
“…an you could peep inside the cerebralised saucepan of this eer illwinded goodfornobody, you would see in his house of thoughtsam…”


12/20/2014

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 177, line 3 from the top
1961 edition p. 184, line 31 from the top
1986 edition p. 151, line 30
“Glittereyed his rufous skull close to his greencapped desklamp sought the face bearded amid darkgreener shadow, an ollav, holyeyed.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 292, top of page:
“…that is what lamoor that of gentle breast rathe is intaken seems circling toward out fondest…”


12/13/2014

Ulysses – (new chapter)
1922 edition p. 174\
1961 edition p. 182 – top of page
1986 edition p. 151 /
“Urbane, to comfort them, the quaker librarian purred:”

Finnegans Wake
p. 291, line 22 from the top:
“…of that miching micher’s bearded but insensible virility and its gaulish mous­taches…”


12/06/2014

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 174, line 16 from the top
1961 edition p. 182, line 34 from the top
1986 edition p. 149, line 1151
“Sir Frederick Falkiner going into the freemasons’ hall. Solemn as Troy.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 291, line 14 from the top:
“…also cliptbuss (the best was still there if the torso was gone) where he did and when he did, re­triever to the last…”


11/30/2014

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 172, line 17 from the top
1961 edition p. 180, line 35 from the top
1986 edition p. 148, line 1075
“A blind stripling stood tapping the curbstone with his slender cane.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 291, line 3 from the top:
“…to synamite up the old Adam-he-used-to…”


11/15/2014 (recapped in this blog-post)

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 170, line 2 from the top
1961 edition p. 178, line 20 from the top
1986 edition p. 146, line 989
“Paddy Leonard and Bantam Lyons came in.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 290, footnote 6:
“No wonder Miss Dotsh took to veils and she descended from that obloquohy.”


11/08/2014

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 167, line 24 from the top
1961 edition p. 175, line 39 from the top
1986 edition p. 144, line 896
“Stuck on the pane two flies buzzed, stuck.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 290, line 17 from the top:
“…bymby when saltwater he wush him these islands…”


11/01/2014

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 165, line 10 from the top
1961 edition p. 173, line 17 from the top
1986 edition p. 142, line 804
“Hope that dewdrop doesn’t come down into his glass. No, snuffled it up.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 290, line 5 from the top:
“(4.32 M.P., old time, to be precise, according to all three doctors waterburies that was Mac Auliffe and poor MacBeth and poor MacGhimley to the tickle ticks…”


10/25/2014

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 162, line 22 from the top
1961 edition p. 170, line 25 from the top
1986 edition p. 1339, line 702
“He came out into clearer air and turned back towards Grafton street.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 289, bottom of page:
“…and beauty alone of all dare say when now, uncrowned…”


10/18/2014

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 160, line 14 from the top
1961 edition p. 168, line 10 from the top
1986 edition p. 137, line 614
“Grafton street gay with housed awnings lured his senses.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 289, line 20 from the top:
“…of course this has blameall in this medeoturanian world to say…”


10/04/2014

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 159, line 9 from the top
1961 edition p. 167, top of page
1986 edition p. 137, line 571
“Now that I come to think of it that ball falls at Greenwich time.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 289, line 14 from the top:
“…Bill Hayses’s and Ellishly Haught’s, hoc…”


09/27/2014

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 157, line 33 from the top
1961 edition p. 165, line 25 from the top
1986 edition p. 135, line 520
“—Of the twoheaded octopus, one of whose heads is the head upon which the ends of the world have forgotten to come while the other speaks with a Scotch accent. The tentacles ….”

Finnegans Wake
p. 289, line 11 from the top:
“…cummal, having listed curefully to the interlooking and the under­lacking of her twentynine shifts…”


09/20/2014

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 156, line 10 from the top
1961 edition p. 163, line 36 from the top
1986 edition p. 133, line 419
“James Stephen’s idea was the best.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 288, line 27 from the top:
“…for our massangrey if mosshungry people…”


09/13/2014

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 155, line 10 from the top
1961 edition p. 162, line 35 from the top
1986 edition p. 133, line 419
“He gazed after the last broad tunic.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 288, line 23 from the top:
“…and that same galloroman cultous is very prevailend up to this windiest of landhavemiseries….”


08/30/2014

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 153, line 2 from the top
1961 edition p. 160, line 20 from the top
1986 edition p. 131, line 334
“Best paper by long chalks for a small ad.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 288, line 9 from the top:
“…how faust of all and on segund thoughts and the thirds the charmhim girlalove and fourthermore….”


07/26/2014

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 151, line 12 from the top
1961 edition p. 158, line 25 from the top
1986 edition p. 130, line 269
“See the eye that woman gave her, passing. Cruel. The unfair sex.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 288, top of page:
“…chanching letters for them vice o’verse to bronze mottes….”


07/19/2014

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 148, line 32 from the top
1961 edition p. 155, line 41 from the top
1986 edition p. 128, line 175
“He walked along the curbstone.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 287, footnote number four:
“Basqueesh, Finnican, Hungulash and Old Teangtaggle, the only pure way to work a curse.”


07/12/2014

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 148, line 7 from the top
1961 edition p. 155, line 39 from the top
1986 edition p. 127, line 15
“He crossed Westmoreland street when apostrophe S had plodded by.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 287, line 18 from the top:
“(for — husk, hisk, a spirit spires — Dolph, dean of idlers, meager suckling of gert stoan…”


06/28/2014

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 145, line 24 from the top
1961 edition p. 152, line 21 from the top
1986 edition p. 125, line 51
“Looking down he saw flapping strongly, wheeling between the gaunt quay walls, gulls.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 286, bottom right-hand marginal note:
“PROPE AND PROCUL IN THE CONVERGENCE OF THEIR CONTRAPULSIVENESS.”


06/21/2014

Ulysses – (new chapter)
1922 edition p. 144
1961 edition p. 151
1986 edition p. 124
“Pineapple rock, lemon platt, butter scotch. A sugarsticky girl shovelling scoopfuls of creams for a christian brother.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 286, line 19 from the top:
“Problem ye ferst, construct ann aquilittoral dryankle Probe loom!”


06/14/2014

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 139, line 7 from the top
1961 edition p. 145, top of page
1986 edition p. 119, line 921
“DEAR DIRTY DUBLIN”

Finnegans Wake
p. 286, line 3 from the top:
” P.t.l.o.a.t.o. HEPTAGRAMMATON”


06/07/2014

Ulysses
1922 edition p. 137 line 26 from the top
1961 edition p. 143 line 18 from the top
1986 edition p. 118, top of page
“OMINOUS – FOR HIM!”

Finnegans Wake
p. 285, line 26 from the top:
“For a surview of all the factionables see Iris in the Evenine’s World.”


05/24/2014

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 133, line 19 from the top
1961 ed. p. 138, line 32 from the top
1985 ed. p. 114, line 726
“SUFFICIENT FOR THE DAY…”

Finnegans Wake
p. 285, footnote 3:
“A pfurty pscore of ruderic rossies haremhorde for his divelsion.”


05/10/2014

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 135, line 5 from the top
1961 ed. p. 137, line 13 from the top
1985 ed. p. 113, line 674
“CLEVER, VERY”

Finnegans Wake
p. 284, footnote at bottom of page:
“A gee is just a jay on the jaunts cowsway.”


05/03/2014

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 130, line 24 from the top
1961 ed. p. 135, line 29 from the top
1985 ed. p. 111, line 626
“THE GREAT GALLAHER”

Finnegans Wake
p. 284, line 18 from the top:
“A Tullagrove pole to the Height of County Fearmanagh…”


04/26/2014

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 130, line 12 from the top
1961 ed. p. 135, line 13 from the top
1985 ed. p. 111, line 614
“YOU CAN DO IT!”


04/12/2014

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 127, line 11 from the top
1961 ed. p. 132, top of page
1985 ed. p. 109, top of page:
“? ? ?”

Finnegans Wake
p. 283, bottom of page:
“Show that the median, hce che ech, interecting at royde angles the parilegs of a given obtuse one biscuts both the arcs that are in curveachord behind.”


04/05/2014

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 123, line 16 from the top
1961 ed. p. 128, top of page
1985 ed. p. 105, line 386
“SPOT THE WINNER”

Finnegans Wake
p. 283, line 24 from the top:
“They wouldn’t took bearings no how anywheres.”


03/29/2014

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 123, top of page
1961 ed. p. 127, line 13 from the top
1985 ed. p. 105, line 370
“O, HARP EOLIAN!”

Finnegans Wake
p. 283, line 20 from the top:
“What signifieth whole that but, be all the prowess of ten, ’tis as strange to relate he, nonparile to rede, rite and reckan, caught allmeals dullmarks for his nucleuds and alegobrew.


03/22/2014

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 120, line 4 from the top
1961 ed. p. 124, line 22 from the top
1985 ed. p. 103, top of page
“SHORT BUT TO THE POINT”


03/08/2014

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 119, line 6 from the top
1961 ed. p. 123, line 17 from the top
1985 ed. p. 102, line 236
“ERIN, GREEN GEM OF THE SILVER SEA”

Finnegans Wake
p. 283, left margin:
Non plus ulstra, Elba, nec, cashellum tuum.


03/01/2014

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 117, top of page
1961 ed. p. 121, line 10 from the top
1985 ed. p. 100, line 104
“ORTHOGRAPHICAL”

Finnegans Wake
p. 282, line 27 from the top:
“And anon an aldays, strues yerthere, would he wile arecreating em om lumerous ways…”


02/22/2014

Ulysses – (new chapter)
1922 ed. p. 114, top of page
1961 ed. p. 118, top of page
1985 ed. p. 97, line 61
“THE CROZIER AND THE PEN”

Finnegans Wake
p. 282, line 7 from the top:
“A flink dab for a freck dive…”


01/25/2014

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 109, line 28 from the top
1961 ed. p. 114, top of page
1985 ed. p. 93, line 962
“Besides how could you remember everybody? Eyes, walk, voice.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 282, line 5 from the top and 2nd right-hand margin note:
“Boon on begyndelse.                      AUSPICIUM”


01/18/2014

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 107, line 4 from the top
1961 ed. p. 111, line 10 from the top
1985 ed. p. 91, line 860
“Does he ever think of the hole waiting for himself?”

Finnegans Wake
p. 282, top of page:
“ANTITHESIS OF AMBIDUAL ANTICIPATION. THE MIND FACTORY, ITS GIVE AND TAKE.”


01/11/2014

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 105, line 23 from the top
1961 ed. p. 109, line 29 from the top
1985 ed. p. 90, line 805
“Now who is that lankylooking galoot over there in the macintosh?”

Finnegans Wake
p. 281, right-hand margin near the bottom of the page:
“INTERROGATION.”


01/04/2014

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 104, line 19 from the top
1961 ed. p. 108, line 20 from the top
1985 ed. p. 89, line 763
“He has seen a fair share go under in his time, lying around him field after field.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 281, line 20 from the top:
“Sickamoor’s so woful sally.”


12/28/2013

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 101, line 30 from the top
1961 ed. p. 105, line 21 from the top
1985 ed. p. 87, line 661
“Mr Bloom nodded gravely looking in the quick bloodshot eyes. Secret eyes, secretsearching.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 281, second right-hand margin note:
“SORTES VIRGINIANAE”


12/21/2013

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 99, line 24 from the top
1961 ed. p. 103, line 10 from the top
1985 ed. p. 85, line 581
“After a moment he followed the others in, blinking in the screened light.”


12/07/2013

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 96, line 14 from the top
1961 ed. p. 99, line 32 from the top
1985 ed. p. 82, line 458
“The carriage steered left for Finglas road.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 281, top right-hand margin note:
“THE PART PLAYED BY BELLETRISTICKS IN THE BELLUM-PAX-BELLUM. MUTUOMORPHOMUTATION.”


11/23/2013

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 95, line 22 from the top
1961 ed. p. 98, line 37 from the top
1985 ed. p. 81, line 427
“—Dunphy’s, Mr Power announced as the carriage turned right.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 280, line 13 from the top:
“Well (enquiries after all­healths) how are you (question maggy).”


11/02/2013

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 90, line 13 from the top
1961 ed. p. 93, line 15 from the top
1985 ed. p. 77, line 229
“Oot: a dullgarbed old man from the curbstone tendered his wares, his mouth opening: oot.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 279, big giant footnote, 26 lines down:
“Wasn’t it just divining that dog of a dag in Skokholme…”


10/19/2013

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 85, line 18 from the top
1961 ed. p. 90, line 15 from the top
1985 ed. p. 74, line 121
“Gasworks. Whooping cough they say it cures.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 279, big giant footnote, 16 lines down:
“They may be yea of my year but they’re nary nay of my day.”


10/05/2013

Ulysses – (new chapter)
1922 ed. p. 87\
1961 ed. p. 84 – top of page
1985 ed. p. 72/
“Martin Cunningham, first, poked his silkhatted head into the creaking carriage and, entering deftly, seated himself. Mr Power stepped in after him, curving his height with care.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 279, top of the big giant footnote:
“Come, smooth of my slate, to the beat of my blosh!”


09/28/2013

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 81, line 24 from the top
1961 ed. p. 84, line 39 from the top
1985 ed. p. 69, line 494
“Brings out the darkness of her eyes. Looking at me, the sheet up to her eyes, Spanish, smelling herself, when I was fixing the links in my cuffs.”


09/14/2013

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 80, line 11 from the top
1961 ed. p. 83, line 21 from the top
1985 ed. p. 68, line 442
“The priest prayed:
“—Blessed Michael, archangel, defend us in the hour of conflict.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 278, 2nd right margin note which continues on following page:
“MAJOR AND MINOR MODES COALESCING PROLIFERATE HOMOGENUINE HOMOGENEITY.”


09/07/2013

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 78, line 19 from the top
1961 ed. p. 81, line 23 from the top
1985 ed. p. 66, line 375
“Meet one Sunday after the rosary. Do not deny my request.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 278, 1st right margin note
“INCIPIT INTERMISSIO.”


08/17/2013

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 77, top of page
1961 ed. p. 79, line 40 from the top
1985 ed. p. 65, line 313
“He had reached the open backdoor of All Hallows.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 277, line 18 from the top
“And it’s time that all paid tribute to this massive mortiality, the pink of punk perfection as photography in mud.”


08/10/2013

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 75, line 29 from the top
1961 ed. p. 78, line 31 from the top
1985 ed. p. 64, line 275
“Fingering still the letter in his pocket he drew the pin out of it.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 277, line 18 from the top
“We will not say it shall not be, this passing of order and order’s coming…”


08/03/2013

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 73, line 35 from the top
1961 ed. p. 76, line 40 from the top
1985 ed. p. 63, line 210
“Mr Bloom went round the corner and passed the drooping nags of the hazard.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 277, line 12 from the top
“For as Anna was at the beginning lives yet and will return…”


07/27/2013

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 72, line 4 from the top
1961 ed. p. 75, top of page
1985 ed. p. 61, line 145
“What is home without / Plumtree’s Potted Meat? / Incomplete / With it an abode of bliss.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 277, line 7 from the top (mid-sentence – sorry)
“To obedient of civicity in urbanious at felicity…”


07/13/2013

Ulysses – (new chapter)
1922 ed. p. 68 \
1961 ed. p. 71 – top of page
1985 ed. p. 58 /
“By lorries along sir John Rogerson’s quay Mr Bloom walked soberly, past Windmill lane, Leask’s the linseed crusher, the postal telegraph office.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 277, top of page
“His sevencoloured’s soot (Ochone! Ochonal!) and his imponence one heap lumpblock (Mogoul!).


07/06/2013

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 67, line 3 from the top
1961 ed. p. 69, line 18 from the top
1985 ed. p. 56, line 518
“Might manage a sketch. By Mr and Mrs L. M. Bloom.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 276, line 23 from the top
“And still here is noctules and can tell things acommon on by that fluffy feeling.”


06/29/2013

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 65, line 5 from the top
1961 ed. p. 67, line 13 from the top
1985 ed. p. 55, line 457
“A soft qualm, regret, flowed down his backbone, increasing.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 276, line 17 from the top
“Gipoo, good oil!”


06/01/2013

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 62, line 35 from the top
1961 ed. p. 65, line 8 from the top
1985 ed. p. 53, line 3366
“The sluggish cream wound curdling spirals through her tea.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 276, line 11 from the top (new paragraph!)
“Dogs’ vespers are anending. Vespertiliabitur.”


05/11/2013

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 62, line 11 from the top
1961 ed. p. 64, line 20 from the top
1985 ed. p. 52, line 341
“-Metempsychosis, he said, frowning. It’s Greek: from the Greek. That means the transmigration of souls.”


05/04/2013

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 60, line 30 from the top
1961 ed. p. 63, line 5 from the top
1985 ed. p. 51, line 291
“Poor old professor Goodwin. Dreadful old case.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 276, top-left marginal note
“Some is out for twoheaded dulcarnons but more pulfers turnips.”


04/27/2013

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 59, line 23 from the top
1961 ed. p. 61, line 34 from the top
1985 ed. p. 50, line 243
“Two letters and a card lay on the hallfloor.”


04/13/2013

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 59, line 11 from the top
1961 ed. p. 61, line 21 from the top
1985 ed. p. 50, line 230
“Grey horror seared his flesh.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 275, left marginal note
“Quick quake quokes the parrotbook of dates.”


04/06/2013

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 58, line 6 from the top
1961 ed. p. 60, line 11 from the top
1985 ed. p. 49, line 186
“A speck of eager fire from foxeyes thanked him. He withdrew his gaze after an instant. No: better not: another time.”


03/09/2013

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 54, line 5 from the top
1961 ed. p. 55, line 38 from the top
1985 ed. p. 45, line 10
“She blinked up out of her avid shameclosing eyes, mewing plaintively and long, showing him her milkwhite teeth.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 275, line 9 from the top
“…signs is on the bellyguds bastille back…”


03/02/2013

Ulysses – (new chapter)
1922 ed. p. 53, line 9 from the top
1961 ed. p. 55, line 10 from the top
1985 ed. p. 45, line 10
“The coals were reddening.”


02/23/2013

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 50, line 7 from the top
1961 ed. p. 50, line 27 from the top
1985 ed. p. 42, line 488
“He took the hilt of his ashplant, lunging with it softly, dallying still.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 275, line 3 from the top
“And as, these things being so or ere those things having done, way back home in Pacata Auburnia…”


02/16/2013

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 49, line 9 from the top
1961 ed. p. 49, line 25 from the top
1985 ed. p. 41, line 437
“In long lassoes from the Cock lake the water flowed full, covering greengoldenly lagoons of sand, rising, flowing.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 274, bottom footnote
“All the world loves a big gleaming jelly.”


02/09/2013

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 48, line 3 from the top
1961 ed. p. 49, line 7 from the top
1985 ed. p. 41, line 437
“He lay back at full stretch over the sharp rocks, cramming the scribbled note and pencil into a pock his hat.”


02/02/2013

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 48, line 3 from the top
1961 ed. p. 48, line 16 from the top
1985 ed. p. 40, line 408
“His shadow lay over the rocks as he bent, ending.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 274, line 12
“Number Thirty two West Eleventh streak…”


01/26/2013

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 46, line 2 from the top
1961 ed. p. 46, line 7 from the top
1985 ed. p. 38, line 332
“Their dog ambled about a bank of dwindling sand, trotting, sniffing on all sides.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 274, bottom footnote
“All the world loves a big gleaming jelly.”


01/19/2013

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 45, line 18 from the top
1961 ed. p. 45, line 21 from the top
1985 ed. p. 38, line 310
“The dog’s bark ran towards him, stopped, ran back.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 274, line 2 from the top
“The allriddle of it? That that is allruddy with us…”


01/12/2013

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 44, line 30 from the top
1961 ed. p. 44, line 33 from the top
1985 ed. p. 37, line 286
“A bloated carcass of a dog lay lolled on bladderwrack.”


01/05/2013

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 43, line 37 from the top
1961 ed. p. 43, line 38 from the top
1985 ed. p. 33, line 253
“Loveless, landless, wifeless. She is quite nicey comfy without her outcast man, madame in rue Gît-le-Cœur, canary and two buck lodgers. Peachy cheeks, a zebra skirt, frisky as a young thing’s.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 273, bottom of page
“With its tricuspidal hauberkhelm coverchaf emblem on.”


12/29/2012

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 42, line 24 from the top
1961 ed. p. 42, line 22 from the top
1985 ed. p. 33, line 120
“His feet marched in sudden proud rhythm over the sand furrows, along by the boulders of the south wall.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 273, line 19 from the top
“O what a loovely free­speech ’twas (tep) to gar howalively hintergrunting!”


12/22/2012

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 41, line 15 from the top
1961 ed. p. 41, line 11 from the top
1985 ed. p. 34, line 158
“He halted. I have passed the way to aunt Sara’s. Am I not going there? Seems not.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 273, third footnote
“Hoppity Huhneye, hoosh the hen. I like cluckers, you like nuts (wink).”


12/15/2012

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 40, line 36 from the top
1961 ed. p. 40, line 9 from the top
1985 ed. p. 33, line 120
“And at the same instant perhaps a priest round the corner is elevating it.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 273, line 10 from the top
“For there’s one mere ope for downfall ned.”


12/01/2012

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 38, line 20 from the top
1961 ed. p. 38, line 10 from the top
1985 ed. p. 32, line 45
“Wombed in sin darkness I was too, made not begotten.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 273, line 6 from the top
“Fas est dass and foe err you.”


11/17/2012

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 38, top of page
1961 ed. p. 37, line 28 from the top
1985 ed. p. 31, line 25
“Open your eyes now. I will. One moment. Has all vanished since?”

Finnegans Wake
p. 273, top of page
“By old Grumbledum’s walls. Bumps, bellows and bawls.”


11/10/2012

Ulysses – (new chapter)
1922 ed. p. 37 \
1961 ed. p. 37 – top of page
1985 ed. p. 31 /
“Ineluctable modality of the visible: at least that if no more, thought through my eyes.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 272, line 28 from the top
“Foamous homely brew, bebattled by bottle, gageure de guegerre.”


11/03/2012

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 32, line 4 from the top
1961 ed. p. 31, line 41 from the top
1985 ed. p. 26, line 289
“—That reminds me, Mr Deasy said.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 272, line 16 from the top
“But, holy Janus, I was forgetting the Blitzenkopfs!”


10/27/2012

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 30, line 31 from the top
1961 ed. p. 30, line 29 from the top
1985 ed. p. 25, line 242
“-He knew what money was, Mr, Deasy said, pointing his finger.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 272, right-hand margin
“PANOPTICAL PURVIEW OF POLITICAL PROGRESS AND THE FUTURE PRESENTATION OF THE PAST”


10/20/2012

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 28, line 35 from the top
1961 ed. p. 28, line 28 from the top
1985 ed. p. 24, line 168
“Like him was I…”


10/13/2012

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 28, line 25 from the top
1961 ed. p. 28, line 5 from the top
1985 ed. p. 23, line 151
“Sitting at his side Stephen solved out the problem.


10/06/2012

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 24, line 17 from the top
1961 ed. p. 24, line 9 from the top
1985 ed. p. 20, line 80
“—Turn over, Stephen said quietly.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 271, line 29 from the top
“Wide hiss, we’re wizening.”


09/01/2012

Ulysses – (new chapter)
1922 ed. p. 24 \
1961 ed. p. 24 – top of page
1985 ed. p. 20 /
“—You, Cochrane, what city sent for him?”

Finnegans Wake
p. 271, line 17 from the top
“And then? What afters it?”


08/25/2012

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 18, line 26 from the top
1961 ed. p. 18, line 29 from the top
1985 ed. p. 16, line 577
“—I read a theological interpretation of it somewhere, he said bemused.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 271, line 14 from the top
“She’ll confess it by her figure and she’ll deny it to your face.”


08/18/2012

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 11, line 25 from the top
1961 ed. p. 11, line 24 from the top
1985 ed. p. 10, line 313
“In the gloomy domed livingroom of the tower Buck Mulligan’s gowned form moved briskly to and fro about the hearth, hiding and revealing its yellow glow.”


08/11/2012

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 9, line 29 from the top
1961 ed. p. 9, line 32 from the top
“A cloud began to cover the sun slowly, shadowing the bay in deeper green.”
(Gabler edition is slightly different):
1985 ed. p. 8, line 248
“A cloud began to cover the sun slowly, wholly, shadowing the bay in deeper green.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 271, line 6 from the top
“You may fail to see the lie of that layout, Suetonia…”


08/04/2012

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 7, line 16 from the top
1961 ed. p. 7, line 15 from the top
1985 ed. p. 6, line 160
“—And to think of your having to beg from these swine.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 270, line 29 from the top
“One hath just been areading, hath not one, ya, ya…”


07/28/2012

Ulysses
1922 ed. p. 4, line 19 from the top
1961 ed. p. 4, line 23 from the top
1985 ed. p. 4, line 57
“—He was raving all night about a black panther, Stephen said. Where is his guncase?”

Finnegans Wake
p. 270, line 14 from the top
“Atac first, queckqueck quicks after.”


07/21/2012

Ulysses
Beginning of the book:
“Stately, plump…”

Finnegans Wake
p. 270, line 3 from the top:
“Yoking apart and oblique ora­tions parsed to one side, a brat, alanna, can choose from so many…”


07/07/2012

Exiles
Beginning of the third act:
“(The drawingroom of Richard Rowan’s house at Merrion.)”


06/30/2012

Exiles
Beginning of the second act:
“(A room in Robert Hand’s cottage at Ranelagh”.)”


06/09/2012

Exiles
Final scene of the first act, after Richard and Archie’s scene, when:
“BERTHA enters by the door on the left.”


05/26/2012

Exiles
First act

Finnegans Wake
p. 269, line 28 from the top:
“Pop! And egg she active or spoon she passive…“


05/19/2012

Dubliners
Final story, “The Dead” – finale:
“She was fast asleep.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 269, line 19 from the top:
“To me or not to me. Satis thy quest on.“


05/12/2012

Dubliners
Final story, “The Dead” – getting close to the end:
“Gabriel felt humiliated by the failure of his irony and by the evocation of this figure from the dead, a boy in the gasworks.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 269, line 2 from the top:
“Have your little sintalks in the dunk of subjunctions…“


05/05/2012

Dubliners
Final story, “The Dead” – right before the final dialogue between Gabriel and Gretta:
“A ghostly light from the street lamp lay in a long shaft from one window to the door. “

Finnegans Wake
p. 268, line 22 from the top:
“Take the dative with his oblative…“


04/28/2012

Dubliners
Final story, “The Dead” – a number of pages into the third section:
“Like distant music these words that he had written years before were borne towards him from the past.”


04/21/2012

Dubliners
Final story, “The Dead” – a few pages into the third section:
“Gabriel had not gone to the door with the others.”


04/14/2012

Dubliners
Final story, “The Dead” – beginning of third section:
“The piercing morning air came into the hall where they were standing so that Aunt Kate said:
-Close the door, somebody. Mrs Malins will get her death of cold.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 268, line 11 from the top (mid-sentence):
“…andt’s avarice and grossopper’s grandegaffe…“


04/07/2012

Dubliners
Final story, “The Dead” – near the end of the second section:
“-But yet, continued Gabriel, his voice falling into a softer inflection, there are always in gatherings such as this sadder thoughts that will recur to our minds: thoughts of the past, of youth, of changes, of absent faces that we miss here tonight.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 268, right-hand margin:
“EARLY NOTIONS OF ACQUIRED RIGHTS AND THE INFLUENCE OF COLLECTIVE TRADITION UPON THE INDIVIDUAL.“


03/31/2012

Dubliners
Final story, “The Dead” – a little past halfway through the second section:
“Nobody answered this question and Mary Jane led the table back to the legitimate opera.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 268, 2nd line from the top:
“(ringrang, the chimes of sex appealing as conchitas with sentas stray“


03/24/2012

Dubliners
Final story, “The Dead” – about halfway through the second section:
“On the landing outside the drawing-room Gabriel found his wife and Mary Jane trying to persuade Miss Ivors to stay for supper.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 267, 6th footnote:
“All abunk for Tarararat! Look slipper, soppyhat, we’ve a doss in the manger.“


03/17/2012

Dubliners
Final story, “The Dead” – a few more pages into the second section:
“While she was threading her way back across the room Mrs Malins, without adverting to the interruption, went on to tell Gabriel what beautiful places there were in Scotland and beautiful scenery.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 267, line 6 from the top:
“Ausonius Audacior and gael, gillie, gall.“


03/10/2012

Dubliners
Final story, “The Dead” – a few pages into the second section:
“Lancers were arranged. Gabriel found himself partnered with Miss Ivors.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 266, line 20 from the top:
“Here (the memories framed from walls are minding)…“


03/03/2012

Dubliners
Final story, “The Dead” – beginning of second section:
“Gabriel could not listen while Mary Jane was playing her Academy piece, full of runs and difficult passages, to the hushed drawing-room.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 266, line 15 from the top:
“The chorus: the principals. For the rifocillation of their inclination to the manifestation of irritation: doldorboys and doll.“


02/25/2012

Dubliners
Final story, “The Dead” – a few pages in:
“-Here I am as right as the mail, Aunt Kate! Go on up. I’ll follow, called out Gabriel from the dark.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 265, line 20 from the top:
“All out of two barreny old perishers, Tytonyhands and Vlossyhair, a kilolitre in metromyriams.“


02/11/2012

Dubliners
Final story, “The Dead” – opening:
“Lily, the caretaker’s daughter, was literally run off her feet.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 265, line 11 from the top:
“Here are the cottage and the bungalow for the cobbeler and the brandnewburgher…“


02/04/2012

Dubliners
14th story, “Grace” – third part, opening:
“The transept of the Jesuit Church in Gardiner Street was almost full; and still at every moment gentlemen entered from the side door and, directed by the lay-brother, walked on tiptoe along the aisles until they found seating accommodation.”


01/28/2012

Dubliners
14th story, “Grace” – a little past the halfway point:
“The gentlemen drank again, one following another’s example.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 265, line 6 from the top:
“By this riverside, on our sunnybank, how buona the vista, by Santa Rosa!“


01/21/2012

Dubliners
14th story, “Grace” – second part, a few pages in:
“The gentlemen began to talk of the accident.”


01/14/2012

Dubliners
14th story, “Grace” – beginning of second part:
“Two gentlemen who were in the lavatory at the time tried to lift him up: but he was quite helpless.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 263, line 13 from the top:
“In these places sojournemus, where Eblinn water, leased of carr and fen, leaving amont her shoals and salmen browses, whom inshore breezes woo with freshets, windeth to her broads.“


01/07/2012

Dubliners
14th story, “Grace” – about two-thirds through:
“Two gentlemen who were in the lavatory at the time tried to lift him up: but he was quite helpless.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 263, line 13 from the top:
“Honour commercio’s energy yet aid the linkless proud, the plurable with everybody and ech with pal, this ernst of Allsap’s ale halliday of roaring month with its two lunar eclipses and its three saturnine settings!”


12/31/2011

Dubliners
13th story, “A Mother” – about two-thirds through:
“The two men went along some tortuous passages and up a dark staircase and came to a secluded room where one of the stewards was uncorking bottles for a few gentlemen.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 263, line 13 from the top:
“Hispano-Cathayan-Euxine, Castilian-Emeratic-Hebridian, Espanol-Cymric-Helleniky?”


12/17/2011

Dubliners
13th story, “A Mother” – 2 to 3 pages in:
“The concerts were to be on Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, and Saturday.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 262, line 20 from the top:
“Staplering to tether to, steppingstone to mount by, as the Boote’s at Pickardstown.”


12/10/2011

Dubliners
13th story, “A Mother” – beginning:
“Mr Holohan, assistant secretary of the Eire Abu Society, had been walking up and down Dublin for nearly a month…”

Finnegans Wake
p. 262, line 12 from the top:
“At furscht kracht of thunder.”


12/03/2011

Dubliners
12th story, “Ivy Day in the Committee Room” – a little past halfway through:
“At this point there was a knock at the door, and a boy put in his head.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 261, line 19 from the top (mid-sentence):
“…in his antisipiences as in his recognisances…”


11/19/2011

Dubliners
12th story, “Ivy Day in the Committee Room” – about a third of the way through:
“The old man returned with a few lumps of coal which he placed here and there on the fire.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 261, line 13 from the top:
“Length Withought Breath, of him, a chump of the evums…”


11/12/2011

Dubliners
12th story, “Ivy Day in the Committee Room” – a few pages in:
“Mr Henchy began to snuffle and to rub his hands over the fire at a terrific speed.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 261, footnote:
“When we play dress grownup at alla ludo poker you’ll be happnessised to feel how fetching I can look in clingarounds.”


10/29/2011

Dubliners
12th story, “Ivy Day in the Committee Room” – beginning:
“Old Jack raked the cinders together with a piece of cardboard and spread them judiciously over the whitening dome of coals.”

Finnegans Wake
p. 260, line 8 from the top:
“Whence. Quick lunch by our left, wheel, to where.”


10/22/2011

Dubliners
11th story, “A Painful Case” – about three quarters of the way through:
“Mr Duffy raised his eyes from the paper and gazed out of his window on the cheerless evening landscape.”

Finnegans Wake
New Chapter – p. 260, top of the page:
“As we there are where are we are we there from tomtittot to teetootomtotalitarian. Tea tea too oo.”


10/15/2011

Dubliners
11th story, “A Painful Case” – about a third of the way through:
“Sometimes in return for his theories she gave out some fact of her own life.”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 258, line 25 from the top (mid-paragraph):
“Loud, hear us!”


10/08/2011

Dubliners
11th story, “A Painful Case” – beginning:
“Mr James Duffy lived in Chapelizod because he wished to live as far as possible from the city of which he was a citizen and because he found all the other suburbs of Dublin mean, modern, and pretentious.”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 258, line 9 from the top (mid-paragraph):
“Yip! Yup! Yarrah!”


10/01/2011

Dubliners
10th story, “Clay” – a little past half-way:
“But Joe said it didn’t matter and made her sit down by the fire. He was very nice with her.”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 257, line 29 from the top:
“Byfall.”


09/24/2011

Dubliners
10th story, “Clay” – a couple-or-so pages in:
“But wasn’t Maria glad when the women had finished their tea and the cook and the dummy had begun to clear away the tea-things!”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 257, line 10 from the top (mid-sentence):
“…about old Father Barley how he got up of a morning arley…”


09/17/2011

Dubliners
10th story, “Clay” – beginning:
“The matron had given her leave to go out as soon as the women’s tea was over, and Maria looked forward to her evening out.”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 256, line 34 from the top:
“That little cloud, a nibulissa, still hangs isky.”


09/10/2011

Dubliners
9th story, “Counterparts” – about two-thirds of the way through:
“A very sullen-faced man stood at the corner of O’Connell Bridge waiting for the little Sandymount tram to take him home.”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 256, line 17 from the top:
“For they are now tearing, that is, teartoretorning.”


09/03/2011

Dubliners
9th story, “Counterparts” – about a third of the way through:
“The moist pungent perfume lay all the way up to Mr Alleyne’s room.”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 255, line 27 from the top – mid paragraph:
“For the producer (Mr John Baptister Vickar) caused a deep abuliousness to descend upon the Father of Truants…”


08/27/2011

Dubliners
9th story, “Counterparts” – beginning:
“The bell rang furiously…”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 255, line 22 from the top – mid paragraph:
“Even if you are the kooper of the winkel over measure never lost a licence.”


08/20/2011

Dubliners
8th story, “A Little Cloud” – about three quarters of the way through:
“Little Chandler sat in the room off the hall, holding a child in his arms.”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 254, line 34 from the top – mid paragraph:
“For now at last is Longabed going to be gone to, that more than man…”


08/13/2011

Dubliners
8th story, “A Little Cloud” – about half of the way through:
“Ignatius Gallaher made a catholic gesture with his right arm.”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 254, line 29 from the top – mid paragraph:
“Hoet of the rough throat attack but whose say is soft but whose ee has a cute angle, he whose hut is a hissarlik even as her hennin’s aspire.”


08/06/2011

Dubliners
8th story, “A Little Cloud” – about a third of the way through:
“Little Chandler quickened his pace. For the first time in his life he felt himself superior to the people he passed.”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 254, line 18 from the top – mid paragraph:
“The mar of murmury mermers to the mind’s ear, uncharted rock, evasive weed.”


07/16/2011

Dubliners
7th story, “The Boarding House” – beginning:
“Mrs Mooney was a butcher’s daughter.”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 253, line 33 from the top:
“But, vrayedevraye Blankdeblank, god of all machineries and tomestone of Barnstaple, by mortisection or vivisuture, splitten up or recompounded, an isaac jacquemin mauromormo milesian, how accountibus for him, moreblue?”


07/09/2011

Dubliners
7th story, “Two Gallants” – abour halfway through:
“The two young men walked up the street without speaking, the mournful music following them. “

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 253, line 19 from the top (mid-paragraph):
“Evidentament he has failed as tiercely as the deuce before for she is wearing none of the three.”


07/02/2011

Dubliners
7th story, “Two Gallants” – beginning:
“The grey warm evening of August had descended upon the city, and a mild warm air, a memory of summer, circulated in the streets.”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 253, line 5 from the top (mid-paragraph):
“Nor that the mappamund has been changing pattern as youth plays moves from street to street…”


06/25/2011

Dubliners
6th story, “After the Race” – beginning:
“The cars came scudding in towards Dublin, running evenly like pellets in the groove of the Naas Road.”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 252, line 33 from the top:
“Creedless, croonless hangs his haughty.”


06/04/2011

Dubliners
5th story, “Eveline” – beginning:
“She sat at the window watching the evening invade the avenue.”


05/28/2011

Dubliners
3rd story, “Araby” – about halfway through:
“On Saturday morning I reminded my uncle that I wished to go to the bazaar in the evening.”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 252, line 25 from the top:
“The thing is he must be put strait on the spot, no mere waterstichystuff in a selfmade world that you can’t believe a word he’s written in, not for pie, but one’s only owned by naturel rejection.”


05/21/2011

Dubliners
3rd story, “Araby” – beginning:
“North Richmond Street, being blind, was a quiet street except at the hour when the Christian Brothers’ School set the boys free.”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 251, line 35 from the top:
“But listen to the mocking birde to micking barde making bared! We’ve heard it aye since songdom was gemurrmal.”


05/14/2011

Dubliners
2nd story, “An Encounter” – about midway through:
“It was too late and we were too tired to carry out our project of visiting the Pigeon House.”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 251, line 21 from the top:
“As for she could shake him. An oaf, no more. Still he’d be good tutor two in his big armschair lerningstoel and she be waxen in his hands.”


05/07/2011

Dubliners
2nd story, “An Encounter” – beginning:
“It was Joe Dillon who introduced the Wild West to us.”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 250, line 34 from the top:
“Led by Lignifer, in four hops of the happiest, ach beth cac duff, a marrer of the sward incoronate, the few fly the far between!”


04/09/2011

Dubliners
1st story, “The Sisters” – about halfway through:
“As I walked along in the sun I remembered old Cotter’s words and tried to remember what had happened afterwards in the dream.”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 250, line 16 from the top:
“For a burning would is come to dance inane. Glamours hath moidered’s lieb and herefore Coldours must leap no more. Lack breath must leap no more.”


04/02/2011

Dubliners
1st story: “The Sisters”
“There was no hope for him this time: it was the third stroke.”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 249, line 34 from the top:
“They pretend to helf while they simply shauted at him sauce to make hims prich.”


03/19/2011

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
1992 Penguin ed. p. 274, line 11 from the top
Modern Library ed. p. 297, line 22 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 251, line 23 from the top
Viking Portable ed. p. 524, line 25 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 243, line 2740
“13 April: That tundish has been on my mind for a long time.”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 249, line 5 from the top:
“Luck!”


03/12/2011

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
1992 Penguin ed. p. 271, top of page
Modern Library ed. p. 294, top of page
Viking-Compass ed. p. 248, line 28 from the top
Viking Portable ed. p. 521, line 13 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 240, line 2638
“24 March: Began with a discussion with my mother. Subject: B.V.M. “

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 248, line 25 from the top:
“And somebody’s coming, I feel for a rect.”


03/05/2011

Stephen Hero
p. 246, line 27 from the top:
“That evening at dinner Mr Fulham was in genial spirits and began to address his conversation pointedly to Stephen.”

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
1992 Penguin ed. p. 266, line 27 from the top
Modern Library ed. p. 289, line 9 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 245, line 5 from the top
Viking Portable ed. p. 517, line 2 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 236, line 2507
“His hat had come down on his forehead. He shoved it back and in the shadow of the trees Stephen saw his pale face, framed by the dark, and his large dark eyes.”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 248, line 11 from the top:
“My top it was brought Achill’s low, my middle I ope before you, my bottom’s a vulser if ever there valsed and my whole the flower that stars the day and is solly well worth your pilger’s fahrt.”


02/26/2011

Stephen Hero
p. 237, line 8 from the top:
“From the Broadstone to Mullingar is a journey of some fifty miles across the midlands of Ireland.”

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
1992 Penguin ed. p. 259, line 17 from the top
Modern Library ed. p. 281, line 5 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 238, line 22 from the top
Viking Portable ed. p. 509, line 20 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 226, line 2277
“-Let us eke go.”


02/19/2011

Stephen Hero
p. 222, line 5 from the top:
“-Yes, of course …. And as for the temptation which Satan was allowed to dangle before the eyes of Jesus it is, in reality, the most ineffectual temptation to offer to any man of genius.”

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
1992 Penguin ed. p. 254, line 30 from the top
Modern Library ed. p. 276, line 3 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 234, line 18 from the top
Viking Portable ed. p. 504, line 30 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 226, line 2133
“Cranly had taken another dried fig from the supply in his pocket and was eating it slowly and noisily.”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 247, line 32 from the top:
“He knows for he’s seen it in black and white through his eyetrompit trained upon jenny’s and all that sort of thing which is dandymount to a clear obscure.”


02/12/2011

Stephen Hero
p. 216, line 7 from the top:
“The announcement of the result of the examination led to a domestic squabble.”

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
1992 Penguin ed. p. 253, line 5 from the top
Modern Library ed. p. 273, line 26 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 232, line 24 from the top
Viking Portable ed. p. 502, line 28 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 224, line 2069
“He began to beat the frayed end of his ashplant against the base of a pillar.”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 247, line 17 from the top:
“He wept indeiterum. With such a tooth he seemed to love his wee tart when abut.”


02/05/2011

Stephen Hero
p. 211, line 10 from the top:
“The Young Lady – (drawling discreetly) …. O, yes …. I was …. at the …. cha …. pel …”

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
1992 Penguin ed. p. 248, line 5
Modern Library ed. p. 268, line 19 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 228, line 18 from the top
Viking Portable ed. p. 497, line 36 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 219, line 1865
“The park trees were heavy with rain; and rain fell still and ever in the lake, lying grey like a shield.”


01/29/2011

Stephen Hero
p. 202, line 24 from the top:
“-You want to sell your verses, don’t you, said Lynch abruptly, and to a public you say you despise?”

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
1992 Penguin ed. p. 246, line 13
Modern Library ed. p. 266, line 20 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 226, line 32 from the top
Viking Portable ed. p. 496, line 9 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 219, line 1865
“Cranly was sitting over near the dictionaries.”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 247, line 3 from the top (mid-sentence):
“…with their tales within wheels and stucks between spokes…”


01/22/2011

Stephen Hero
p. 194, line 24 from the top:
“He followed his Italian lesson mechanically, feeling the unintermittent deadliness of the atmosphere of the college in his throat and lungs, obscuring his eyes and obfuscating his brain.”

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
1992 Penguin ed. p. 244, line 26
Modern Library ed. p. 264, line 27 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 225, line 13 from the top
Viking Portable ed. p. 494, line 21 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 217, line 1812
“He smiled as he thought of the god’s image for it made him think of a bottlenosed judge in a wig, putting commas into a document which he held at arm’s length, and he knew that he would not have remembered the god’s name but that it was like an Irish oath.”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 246, line 26 from the top:
“For these are not on terms, they twain, bartrossers, since their baffle of Whatalose…”


01/15/2011

Stephen Hero
p. 189, line 18 from the top:
“When she had gone in he went along by the canal bank, still in the shadow of the leafless trees, humming to himself the chant of the Good Friday gospel.”

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
1992 Penguin ed. p. 243 \
Modern Library ed. p. 263 \
Viking-Compass ed. p. 224 – start of new section
Viking Portable ed. p. 493/
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 216/
“What birds were they?”


01/08/2011

Stephen Hero
p. 184, line 14 from the top:
“-There should be an art of gesture, said Stephen one night to Cranly.”

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
1992 Penguin ed. p. 241, line 20
Modern Library ed. p. 261, line 14 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 222, line 20 from the top
Viking Portable ed. p. 491, line 16 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 214, line 1717
“Ten years from that wisdom of children to his folly.”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 246, line 8 from the top:
“My souls and by jings, should he work his jaw to give down the banks and hark from the tomb!”


01/01/2011

Stephen Hero
p. 176, line 19 from the top:
“Stephen studied even less regularly during the second year than he had done during the first. He attended lectures oftener but he seldom went to the Library to read.”

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
1992 Penguin ed. p. 239, line 11
Modern Library ed. p. 258, line 32 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 220, line 18 from the top
Viking Portable ed. p. 485, line 17 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 212, line 1645
“Rude brutal anger routed the last lingering instant of ecstasy from his soul.”


12/18/2010

Stephen Hero
p. 174, line 6 from the top:
“Stephen studied even less regularly during the second year than he had done during the first. He attended lectures oftener but he seldom went to the Library to read.”

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
1992 Penguin ed. p. 235 \
Modern Library ed. p. 254 \
Viking-Compass ed. p. 217 – start of new section
Viking Portable ed. p. 485 /
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 209/
“Towards dawn he awoke. O what sweet music! His soul was all dewy wet.”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 246, line 5 from the top:
“Hushkah, a horn! Gadolmagtog! God es El?”


12/11/2010

Stephen Hero
p. 170, line 10 from the top:
“But the teacher was a poor inquisitor.”

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
the 1992 Penguin ed. p. 233, line 24
the Modern Library ed. p. 252, line 27 from the top
the Viking-Compass ed. p. 215, line 20 from the top
the Viking Portable ed. p. 483, line 17 from the top
the Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 207, line 1471
“A fine rain began to fall from the high veiled sky and they turned into the duke’s lawn to reach the national library before the shower came.”

Finnegans Wake
all the eds. p. 246, line 3 from the top:
“But heed! Our thirty minutes war’s alull.”


12/04/2010

Stephen Hero
p. 166, bottom of page:
“Standing beside the closed piano on the morning of the funeral Stephen heard the coffin bumping down the crooked staircase.”

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
1992 Penguin ed. p. 231, line 23
Modern Library ed. p. 250, line 21 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 213, line 26 from the top
Viking Portable ed. p. 476, line 27 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 206, line 1406
“Stephen paused and, though his companion did not speak, felt that his words had called up around them a thoughtenchanted silence.”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 245, line 35 from the top:
“A’s the sign and one’s the number.”


11/20/2010

Stephen Hero
p. 164, beginning of chapter:
“Stephen was present in the room when his sister died.”

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
1992 Penguin ed. p. 230, line 11 from the top
Modern Library ed. p. 248, line 14 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 211, line 34 from the top
Viking Portable ed. p. 479, line 10 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 204, line 1342
“–To finish what I was saying about beauty, said Stephen, the most satisfying relations of the sensible must therefore correspond to the necessary phases of artistic apprehension.”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 245, line 27 from the top:
“Were you Marely quean of Scuts or but Chrestien the Last”


11/13/2010

Stephen Hero
p. 161, line 14 from the top:
“The summer closed in sultry weather.”

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
1992 Penguin ed. p. 227, line 11
Modern Library ed. p. 245, line 22 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 209, line 27 from the top
Viking Portable ed. p. 476, line 27 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 202, line 1263
“Lynch laughed.
–It amuses me vastly, he said, to hear you quoting him time after time like a jolly round friar”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 245, line 22 from the top:
“Stright! But meetings mate not as forsehn. Hesperons!”


11/06/2010

Stephen Hero
p. 156, line 25 from the top:
“Among the guests was an elder brother of Mrs Daniel’s, Father Healy.”

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
1992 Penguin ed. p. 226, top of page
Modern Library ed. p. 244, line 11 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 208, line 23 from the top
Viking Portable ed. p. 475, line 15 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 200, line 1222
“–But what is beauty? asked Lynch impatiently. Out with another definition. Something we see and like! Is that the best you and Aquinas can do?”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 245, line 13 from the top:
“And if Lubbernabohore laid his horker to the ribber, save the giregargoh and dabardin going on in his mount of knowledge (munt), he would not hear a flip flap in all Finnyland.”


10/30/2010

Stephen Hero
p. 151, beginning of chapter 24:
“Stephen had lent his essay to Lynch as he had promised to do and this loan had led to a certain intimacy.”

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
1992 Penguin ed. p. 226, top of page
Modern Library ed. p. 244, line 11 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 208, line 23 from the top
Viking Portable ed. p. 475, line 15 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 200, line 1222
“–But what is beauty? asked Lynch impatiently. Out with another definition. Something we see and like! Is that the best you and Aquinas can do?”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 245, top of page:
“Rhinohorn isnoutso pigfellow but him ist gonz wurst.”


10/23/2010

Stephen Hero
p. 144, beginning of chapter 22:
“Cranly went to Wicklow at the end of the week leaving Stephen to find another auditor.”

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
1992 Penguin ed. p. 226, top of page
Modern Library ed. p. 244, line 11 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 208, line 23 from the top
Viking Portable ed. p. 475, line 15 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 200, line 1222
“–But what is beauty? asked Lynch impatiently. Out with another definition. Something we see and like! Is that the best you and Aquinas can do?”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 244, line 30 from the top:
“Luathan? Nuathan! Was avond ere a while. Now conticinium.”


10/16/2010

Stephen Hero
p. 136, top of the page:
“Stephen went over to the Library that evening expressly to see Cranly…”

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
1992 Penguin ed. p. 221, line 10 from the top
Modern Library ed. p. 240, line 5 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 205, line 11 from the top
Viking Portable ed. p. 471, line 19 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 197, line 1103
“­The tragic emotion, in fact, is a face looking two ways, towards terror
and towards pity, both of which are phases of it. “


10/09/2010

Stephen Hero
p. 125, line 31 from the top:
“A licence which he allowed himself rather freely was that of impolite abstraction, so deep as to suggest great mental activity but issuing at last in some blunt actuality.”

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
1992 Penguin ed. p. 221, line 10 from the top
Modern Library ed. p. 238, line 34 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 204, line 12 from the top
Viking Portable ed. p. 470, line 16 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 196, line 1068
“–Let us eke go, as Cranly has it.”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 244, line 21 from the top:
“Hound through the maize has fled. What hou! Isegrim under lolling ears. Far wol!”


10/02/2010

Stephen Hero
p. 122, top of page:
“Between Easter and the end of May Stephen’s acquaintance with Cranly progressed night by night.”

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
1992 Penguin ed. p. 217, line 33 from the top
Modern Library ed. p. 235, line 10 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 201, line 9 from the top
Viking Portable ed. p. 466, line 29 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 193, line 961
“–Look at him! he said. Did you ever see such a go-by-the-wall?”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 244, line 13 from the top:
“It darkles, (tinct, tint) all this our funnaminal world.”


09/25/2010

Stephen Hero
p. 115, line 8 from the top:
“-Nos ad manum ballum jocabimus.”

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
1992 Penguin ed. p. 215, line 15 from the top
Modern Library ed. p. 232, line 17 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 198, line 31 from the top
Viking Portable ed. p. 464, line 12 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 191, line 877
“–Nos ad manum ballum jocabimus.”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 244, top of page:
“Hear, O worldwithout! Tiny tattling!”


09/18/2010

Stephen Hero
p. 111, line 19 from the top:
“Stephen did not consider his parents very seriously.”

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
Modern Library ed. p. 226, line 34 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 193, line 12 from the top
Viking Portable ed. p. 459, line 6 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 187, line 716
“The entrance hall was crowded and loud with talk.”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 243, line 32 from the top (mid-sentence):
“…with an ass of milg to his cowmate and chilterlings…”


09/11/2010

Stephen Hero
p. 106, line 24 from the top:
“Madden who could not talk this language well led the group back to English.”

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
Modern Library ed. p. 223, line 32 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 191, line 34 from the top
Viking Portable ed. p. 456, line 10 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 184, line 630
“–So we must distinguish between elliptical and ellipsoidal.”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 243, line 14 from the top:
“Mealwhile she nutre him jacent from her elmer’s almsdish, giantar and tschaina as sieme as bibrondas with Foli Signur’s tinner roumanschy to fishle the ladwigs out of his lugwags, like a skittering kitty skattering hayels, when his favourites were all beruffled on him and her own undesirables justickulating, it was such a blowick day.”


08/28/2010

Stephen Hero
p. 88, line 31 from the top:
“A week before the date fixed for the reading of the paper Stephen consigned a small packet covered with neat characters into the Auditor’s hands.”

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
Modern Library ed. p. 222, line 7 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 190, line 20 from the top
Viking Portable ed. p. 454, line 22 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 183, line 580
“He left the hearth quickly and went towards the landing to oversee the arrival of the first arts’ class.”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 242, line 28 from the top:
“She just as fenny as he is vulgar.”


08/14/2010

Stephen Hero
p. 79, line 24 from the top:
“Chief among these profanities Stephen set the antique principle that the end of art is to instruct, to elevate, and to amuse.”

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
Modern Library ed. p. 221, top of the page
Viking-Compass ed. p. 189, line 23 from the top
Viking Portable ed. p. 453, line 19 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 182, line 546
“–The question you asked me a moment ago seems to me more interesting. What is that beauty which the artist struggles to express from lumps of earth, said Stephen coldly.”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 242, line 5 from the top (mid-sentence):
“…wideawake, woundabout, wokinbetts, weeklings..”


07/31/2010

Stephen Hero
p. 61, beginning of chapter 18:
“Stephen’s paper was fixed for the second Saturday in March.”

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
Modern Library ed. p. 219, line 20 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 188, line 17 from the top
Viking Portable ed. p. 452, line 8 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 181, line 505
“He thrust forward his under jaw and uttered a dry short cough.”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 241, line 23 from the top (mid-paragraph):
“Other accuse him as lochkneeghed forsunkener, dope in stockknob, all ameltingmoult after rhomatism, purely simply tammy ratlins.”


07/24/2010

Stephen Hero
p. 59, line 21:
“The Irish class was held every Wednesday night in a back room on the second floor of a house in O’Connell St.”

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
Modern Library ed. p. 217, line 4 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 186, line 15 from the top
Viking Portable ed. p. 449, line 31 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 179, line 434
“As he came back to the hearth, limping slightly but with a brisk step, Stephen saw the silent soul of a jesuit look out at him from the pale loveless eyes.”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 241, line 16 from the top (mid-paragraph):
“A mish, holy balm of seinsed myrries, he is as good as a mountain and everybody what is found of his gients he knew Meistral Wikingson…”


07/17/2010

Stephen Hero
p. 56, line 32:
“One evening when Maurice came back from school he brought with him the news that the retreat would begin in three days’ time.”

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
Modern Library ed. p. 213, line 25 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 183, line 24 from the top
Viking Portable ed. p. 446, line 25 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 176, line 335
“A hand was laid on his arm and a young voice cried:
–Ah, gentleman, your own girl, sir!”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 241, line 8 from the top (mid-paragraph):
“Collosul rhodomantic not wert one bronze lie Scholarina say as he, greyed vike cuddlepuller, walk in her sleep his pig indicks weg femtyfem funts.”


07/10/2010

Stephen Hero
p. 48, beginning of chapter:
“Stephen’s home-life had by this time grown sufficiently unpleasant…”

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
Modern Library ed. p. 210, line 18 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 181, line 3 from the top
Viking Portable ed. p. 443, line 24 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 174, line 243
“Side by side with his memory of the deeds of prowess of his uncle Mat Davin, the athlete, the young peasant worshipped the sorrowful legend of Ireland.”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 240, line 33 from the top:
“He repeat of him as pious alios cos he ast for shave and haircut people said he’d shape of hegoat where he just was sheep of herrgott with his tile togged. Top.”


06/26/2010

Stephen Hero
p. 32, line 1 from the top:
“To this unknown verses were now regularly inscribed and it seemed that the evil dream of love which Stephen chose to commemorate in these verses lay veritably upon the world now in a season of §damp violet mist.”

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
Modern Library ed. p. 205, line 14 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 178, line 28 from the top
viking Portable ed. p. 438, line 30 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 169, line 96
“Through this image he had a glimpse of a strange dark cavern of speculation but at once turned away from it, feeling that it was not yet the hour to enter it.”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 240, line 29 from the top:
“Drugmallt storehuse. Intrance on back. Most open on the laydays.”


06/12/2010

Stephen Hero
p. 32, line 1 from the top:
“Their Eminences of the Holy College are hardly more scrupulous solitaries during the ballot for Christ’s vicar than was Stephen at this time.”

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
Modern Library ed. p. 205, line 14 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 176, line 13 from the top
viking Portable ed. p. 438, line 30 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 169, line 96
“The lore which he was believed to pass his days brooding upon so that it had rapt him from the companionships of youth was only a garner of slender sentences from Aristotle’s poetics and psychology and a Synopsis Philosophiae Scholasticae ad mentem divi Thomae.”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 240, line 20 from the top:
“He, praise Saint Calembaurnus, make clean breastsack of goody girl now as ever drank milksoep from a spoen…”


06/05/2010

Stephen Hero
p. 23, line 1 from the top:
“[The manuscript begins here]”

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
Modern Library ed. p. 202, line 1 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 174, line 1 from the top
viking Portable ed. p. 435, line 27 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 167, line 1
“He drained his third cup of watery tea to the dregs…”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 240, line 14 from the top:
“He, selfsufficiencer, eggscumuddher-in-chaff sporticolorissimo…”


05/29/2010

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
Modern Library ed. p. 198, line 33 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 171, line 6 from the top
viking Portable ed. p. 433, line 10 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 164, line 848
“He was alone. He was unheeded, happy and near to the wild heart of life.”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 240, line 5 from the top:
“But low, boys low, he rises, shrivering, with his spittyful eyes and his whoozebecome voice.”


05/22/2010

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
Modern Library ed. p. 196, line 6 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 168, line 29 from the top
viking Portable ed. p. 430, line 20 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 162, line 764
“–Stephanos Dedalos! Bous Stephanoumenos! Bous Stephaneforos!”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 239, line 16 from the top:
“Hightime is ups be it down into outs according!”


05/15/2010

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
Modern Library ed. p. 194, line 6 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 167, line 5 from the top
viking Portable ed. p. 428, line 22 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 160, line 704
“He passed from the trembling bridge on to firm land again.”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 238, line 26 from the top:
“The mything smile of me, my wholesole assumption, shes nowt mewithout as weam twin herewithin…”


05/08/2010

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
Modern Library ed. p. 193, line 22 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 166, lione 25 from the top
Viking Portable ed. p. 428, line 5 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 160, line 688
“He drew forth a phrase from his treasure and spoke it softly to himself:
–A day of dappled seaborne clouds.”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 238, line 11 from the top (mid-paragraph – getting raunchy)
“We will be constant (what a word!)…”


05/01/2010

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
Modern Library ed. p. 190 \
Viking-Compass ed. p. 164 – section break
Viking Portable ed. p. 425 /
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 156 /
“He could wait no longer.”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 237, line 22 from the top (mid-paragraph – getting raunchy)
“Sweetstaker, Abel lord of all our haloease…”


04/17/2010

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
Modern Library ed. p. 188, line 23 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 162, line 18 from the top
Viking Portable ed. p. 423, line 10 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 156, line 541
“He crossed the bridge over the stream of the Tolka and turned his eyes coldly…”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 237, line 22 from the top (mid-paragraph – getting raunchy)
“Leperstower, the karman’s loki, has not blanched at our pollution and your intercourse at ninety legsplits does not defile.”


04/03/2010

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
Modern Library ed. p. 184, line 32 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 159, line 13 from the top
Viking Portable ed. p. 419, line 25 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 153, line 429
“He listened in reverent silence now to the priest’s appeal…”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 237, line 11 from the top:
“-Enchainted, dear sweet Stainusless, young confessor, dearer dearest, we herehear, aboutobloss, O coelicola, thee salutamt. “


03/27/2010

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
Modern Library ed. p. 182, line 17 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 157, line 11 from the top
Viking Portable ed. p. 417, line 12 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 151, line 355
“His ears were listening to these distant echoes amid the silence of the parlour when he became aware that the priest was addressing him in a different voice.”

Finnegans Wake
all eds. p. 236, line 31 from the top:
“Just so stylled with the nattes are their flowerheads now and each of all has a lovestalk onto herself…”


03/13/2010

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
Modern Library ed. p. 180, line 7 from the top
Viking Compass ed. p. 155, line 18 from the top
Viking Portable ed p. 415, line 7 from the top
Vintage (Gabler) ed p. 149, line 291
“The names of articles of dress worn by women or of certain soft and delicate stuffs used in their making brought always to his mind a delicate and sinful perfume.”

Finnegans Wake
all eds p.236, line 19 from the top
“Since the days of Roamaloose and Rehmoose the pavanos have been strident through their struts of Chapelldiseut…”


03/06/2010

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
Modern Library ed. p. 177, line 6 from the top
Viking Compass ed. p. 192, bottom of page
Viking Portable ed p. 411, line 29 from the top
Vintage (Gabler) ed p. 146, line 189
“When he had eluded the flood of temptation many times in this way he grew troubled…”

Finnegans Wake
all eds p.134, line 32 from the top (mid paragraph)
“Lady Marmela Shortbred will walk in for supper with her marchpane switch on…”


02/27/2010

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
Modern Library ed. p. 173, line 12 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 149, line 29 from the top
Viking Portable ed. p. 408, line 24 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 141, line 92
“But he could no longer disbelieve in the reality of love…”

Finnegans Wake
All editions, p. 235, line 9 from the top (near end of paragraph):
“― Xanthos! Xanthos! Xanthos!”


02/20/2010

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
Modern Library ed. p. 170 \
Viking-Compass ed. p. 147 – beginning of chapter IV
Viking Portable ed. p. 405 /
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 141/
“Sunday was dedicated to the mystery of the Holy Trinity, Monday to the Holy Ghost, Tuesday to the Guardian Angels, Wednesday to saint Joseph, Thursday to the Most Blessed Sacrament of the Altar, Friday to the Suffering Jesus, Saturday to the Blessed Virgin Mary.”

Finnegans Wake
All editions, p. 234, line 29 from the top (near end of paragraph):
“Meanings: Andure the enjurious till imbetther rer.”


02/13/2010

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
Modern Library ed. p. 163, line 31 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 142, line 7 from the top
Viking Portable ed. p. 400, line 14 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 135, line 1417
“A tall figure came down the aisle and the penitents stirred…”

Finnegans Wake
All editions, p. 234, line 10 from the top (mid-paragraph):
“How he stud theirs with himselfs mookst kevinly…”


02/06/2010

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
Modern Library ed. p. 160, line 15 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 139, line 12 from the top
Viking Portable ed. p. 397, line 4 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 132, line 1318
“When evening had fallen he left the house, and the first touch of the damp dark air and the noise of the door as it closed behind him made ache again his conscience, lulled by prayer and tears. Confess! Confess!”

Finnegans Wake
All editions, p. 233, line 35 from the top (mid-paragraph, bottom of page):
“Makoto! Whagta kriowday! Gelagala nausy is. Yet right divining do not was. Hovobovo hafogate hokidimatzi in kamicha!”


01/30/2010

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
Modern Library ed. p. 156 \
Viking-Compass ed. p. 136 – section break
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 129 /
“He went up to his room after dinner in order to be alone with his soul, and at every step his soul seemed to sigh; at every step his soul mounted with his feet, sighing in the ascent, through a region of viscid gloom.”

Finnegans Wake
All editions, p. 233, line 16 from the top (mid-paragraph):
“But leaving codhead’s mitre and the heron’s plumes sinistrant to the server of servants and rex of regums and making a bolderdash for lubberty of speech he asks not have you seen a match being struck nor is this powder mine but, letting punplays pass to ernest:
—Haps thee jaoneofergs? “


01/23/2010

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
Modern Library ed. p. 150, line 5 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 130, line 31
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 124, line 1019
“Opposed to this pain of extension and yet coexistent with it we have the pain of intensity.”

Finnegans Wake
All editions, p. 232, line 14 from the top (mid-paragraph):
“Now a run for his money! Now a dash to her dot! Old cocker, young crowy, sifadda, sosson. A bran new, speedhount, outstripperous on the wind. Like a waft to wingweary one or a sos to a coastguard.”


01/16/2010

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
Modern Library ed. p. 145, line 13 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 126, bottom of page
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 120, line 881
“He sat again in the front bench of the chapel. The daylight without was already failing and, as it fell slowly through the dull red blinds, it seemed that the sun of the last day was going down and that all souls were being gathered for the judgement.”

Finnegans Wake
All editions, p. 232, line 14 from the top (mid-paragraph):
“And around its scorched cap she has twilled a twine of flame to let the laitiest know she’s marrid.”


01/09/2010

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
Modern Library ed. p. 143, bottom of page
Viking-Compass ed. p. 125, line 31 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 119, line 842
“There was still time. O Mary, refuge of sinners, intercede for him! O Virgin Undefiled, save him from the gulf of death!”

Finnegans Wake
All editions, p. 232, line 9 from the top (mid-paragraph):
“When (pip!) a message interfering intermitting interskips from them (pet!) on herzian waves, (call her venicey names! call her a stell!)…”


01/02/2010

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
Modern Library ed. p. 139, line 31 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 122, line 17 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 116, line 722
“––Consider finally that the torment of this infernal prison is increased by the company of the damned themselves.”

Finnegans Wake
All editions, p. 232, top of page (mid-paragraph):
“And may his tarpitch dilute not give him chromitis!”


12/26/2009

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
Modern Library ed. p. 133, line 6 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 116, line 31 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 110, line 442
“The chapel was flooded by the dull scarlet light that filtered through the lowered blinds…”

Finnegans Wake
All editions, p. 231, line 16 from the top (mid-paragraph):
“Wholly sanguish blooded up disconvulsing the fixtures of his fizz.”


12/19/2009

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
Modern Library ed. p. 130, line 9 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 114, line 18 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 108, line 440
“And this day will come, shall come, must come: the day of death and the day of judgement.”

Finnegans Wake
All editions, p. 230, line 35 from the top (or bottom of page):
“Remember thee, castle throwen? Ones propsperups treed, now stohong baroque.”


12/12/2009

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
Modern Library ed. p. 127, line 8 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 112, top of the page
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 105, line 351
“The next day brought death and judgement, stirring his soul slowly from its listless despair.”

Finnegans Wake
All editions, p. 230, line 26 from the top:
“Tholedoth, treetrene! Zokrahsing, stone!”


12/05/2009

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
Modern Library ed. p. 125, line 5 from the top
Viking-Compass ed. p. 110, line 11 from the top
Vintage/Gabler ed. p. 104, line 289
“–I will ask you, therefore, my dear boys, to put away from your minds during these few days all worldly thoughts, whether of study or pleasure or ambition, and to give all your attention to the state of your souls.”

Finnegans Wake
All editions, p. 230, line 22 from the top:
“…including science of sonorous silence, while he, being brung up on soul butter, have recourse of course to poetry.”